• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

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  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony) - 1946, Tula, source: nne.ru, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    1946, Tula
    source: nne.ru
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: www.youtube.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: www.youtube.com
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: nne.ru, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: nne.ru
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: nne.ru, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: nne.ru
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: www.youtube.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: www.youtube.com
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: www.youtube.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: www.youtube.com
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: www.youtube.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: www.youtube.com
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: www.youtube.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: www.youtube.com
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: www.youtube.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: www.youtube.com
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony) - c. 1919, source: www.youtube.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    c. 1919
    source: www.youtube.com
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: www.youtube.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: www.youtube.com
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony), source: commons.wikimedia.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    source: commons.wikimedia.org
    own collection
  • MARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony) - Contemporary painting, source: drevo-info.ru, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMARCENKO Alexander (Abp Anthony)
    Contemporary painting
    source: drevo-info.ru
    own collection

surname

MARCENKO

surname
versions/aliases

MARCZENKO

forename(s)

Alexander (pl. Aleksander)

religious forename(s)

Anthony (pl. Antoni)

function

archbishop

creed

Eastern Orthodox Church ORmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Orthodox Tula-Belyov eparchymore on
drevo-info.ru
[access: 2020.09.24]

Orthodox Oryol-Bryansk eparchymore on
drevo-info.ru
[access: 2020.09.24]

Orthodox Kirovohrad-Mykolaiv eparchy (Ukrainian Autonomous Orthodox Churchmore on
drevo-info.ru
[access: 2023.07.16]

Orthodox Kherson and Odessa eparchy (Ukrainian Autonomous Orthodox Church)more on
ru.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.09.24]

Orthodox Grodno-Novogrod eparchy (Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church)more on
drevo-info.ru
[access: 2020.09.24]

Orthodox Pińsk-Polesia eparchy (Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church PAOC)more on
pl.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.20]

Orthodox Vilnius eparchymore on
ru.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.09.24]

academic distinctions

Sacred Orthodox Theology Candidate

date and place
of death

19.12.1954

OzerLag labour campGULAG slave labour camp network
today: Tayshet, Irkutsk oblast, Russia

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.04.04]

details of death

From 1917, after the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia, the chaplain of the „White” Volunteer Army (Armed Forces of Southern Russia) fighting against them under the command of General Anton Denikin. However, already in 05.1919 returned to the south and again became the chaplain and dean of the cavalry corps of the Armed Forces of Southern Russia. Prob. took part in the unsuccessful march on Moscow, which began on 03.07.1919. After the defeat in the war with the Bolsheviks, evacuated with the army of General Wrangel, first prob. to the Crimea, and from there in 1920 to Serbia.

In 1922, after Polish victory in Polish–Russian war of 1919‑1921, returned to Poland.

In 11.1926 released from duties in the wake of attempt to make theological schools Ukrainian.

In 03.1931 made an oath to Polish State.

In 1940, after German and Russian attack in 09.1939 of Poland and start of World War II, after start of Russian occupation, made a penance and was readmitted into Russian Orthodox church.

After German attack on 22.06.1941 of their erstwhile ally, Russian, after start of German occupation, became bishop of Kherson–Odessa eparchy.

In 1944, escaping from Russian forces battling Germans went – through Romania – to Czechoslovakia.

There again reverted to Russian Orthodoxy.

Finally on 03.12.1951 arrested by the Russians.

On 01.04.1952 relieved from his Church duties.

On 05.06.1952 sentenced by Russian military court in Tula to 25 years of slave labour in Russian concentration camps Gulag.

Sent to OzerLag concentration camp, to Tayshet.

There perished.

cause of death

extermination

perpetrators

Russians

date and place
of birth

12.03.1887

Odessatoday: Odessa urban hrom., Odessa rai., Odessa, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.02.04]

religious vows

20.07.1912 (permanent)

presbyter (holy orders)
ordination

06.12.1913

positions held

19.07.1946 – 01.04.1952

bishop — Tulatoday: Tula city reg., Tula oblast, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.04.02]
⋄ Russian Orthodox Church — dismissed from office after being arrested by the criminal Russian organization MGB; earlier, on 22.02.1950, distinguished by the right to wear a cross on a klobuk (monastic headgear)

17.01.1946 – 19.07.1946

bishop — Oryoltoday: Oryol oblast, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ Russian Orthodox Church

19.10.1945 – 17.01.1946

rector — Karlovy Varytoday: Karlovy Vary dist., Karlovy Vary reg., Czechia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.06.29]
⋄ St Peter and St Paul the Apostles OR church — acting („ad interim”)

1942 – 25.03.1944

bishop — Kirovohradtoday: Kropyvnytskyi, Kropyvnytsky cityi rai., Kirovohrad, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ Ukrainian Autonomous Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate — during the German occupation, in the face of the Russian offensive and the withdrawal of the Germans, evacuated first to Romania, then through Yugoslavia to Austria (then still part of Germany)

22.08.1941 – 1942

bishop — Ukrainian Autonomous Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate — after German attack on 22.06.1941 on their erstwhile ally, the Russians, during the German occupation

28.03.1941

archbishop — Russian Orthodox Church — dignity conferment

28.10.1940 – 22.08.1941

auxiliary bishop — Kamin–Kashyrskyitoday: Kamin–Kashyrskyi urban hrom., Kamin–Kashyrskyi rai., Volyn, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.27]
⋄ vicariate, Russian Orthodox Church — earlier, on 25.06.1940, after the start of World War II, during the Russian occupation, made a self–criticism, accepted penance and returned to the bosom of the Russian Orthodox Church

from 07.01.1937

auxiliary bishop — Kamin–Kashyrskyitoday: Kamin–Kashyrskyi urban hrom., Kamin–Kashyrskyi rai., Volyn, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.27]
⋄ vicariate, Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church PACP

c. 11.04.1935

hegumen–superior — Zhirovichitoday: Zhirovichi ssov., Slonim dist., Grodno reg., Belarus
more on
be.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.11.09]
⋄ Dormition of the Mother of God OR monastery, Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church PACP

07.05.1934 – 07.1937

bishop — Grodnotoday: Grodno dist., Grodno reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
⋄ Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church PACP — Lat. locum tenens (Eng. „holding reins”), acting („ad interim”); prob. from 05.12.1936 „retired

from 15.04.1933

rector — Vilniustoday: Vilnius city dist., Vilnius Cou., Lithuania
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.06]
⋄ Orthodox Theological Seminary

from 03.1930

auxiliary bishop — Kamin–Kashyrskyitoday: Kamin–Kashyrskyi urban hrom., Kamin–Kashyrskyi rai., Volyn, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.27]
⋄ vicariate, Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church PACP

1928 – 24.05.1930

rector — Meltsitoday: Sokolyshche hrom., Stara Vyzhivka rai., Volyn, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]
⋄ St Nicholas OR monastery, Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church PACP

11.1926 – 1928

resident — Jabłecznatoday: Sławatycze gm., Biała Podlaska pov., Lublin voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
⋄ St Onuphrius OR stavropegial monastery — „retired”, relieved of his functions in connection with the promotion of „Ukrainization” of Orthodox theological schools

22.12.1925 – 11.1926

rector — Kremenetstoday: Kremenets urban hrom., Kremenets rai., Ternopil, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.10.18]
⋄ Orthodox Theological Seminary — also: hegumen–superior of the Epiphany monastery, a small community (seven monks in 1936), in one of the buildings of which was a seminary

c. 1925

hegumen–superior — Dermantoday: Derman Persha and Derman Druha, Mizoch hrom., Rivne rai., Rivne, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.08.05]
⋄ Holy Trinity OR monastery — also: inspector of the Orthodox spiritual schools of the Volhynian eparchy

from 27.10.1924

rector — Vilniustoday: Vilnius city dist., Vilnius Cou., Lithuania
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.06]
⋄ Orthodox Theological Seminary — also: hegumen–superior of the Holy Trinity monastery, a small community in which the seminary was located

26.02.1923 – 01.09.1923

hegumen–superior — Jabłecznatoday: Sławatycze gm., Biała Podlaska pov., Lublin voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
⋄ St Onuphrius OR stavropegial monastery

from 25.02.1923

auxiliary bishop — Lublintoday: Lublin city pov., Lublin voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.20]
⋄ vicariate, Russian Orthodox Church — the eparchy was de iure still dependent on the Russian Orthodox Church, although efforts were made for the autocephaly of the Polish Church; autocephaly materialised on 01.12.1924, when it was granted by the Patriarch of Constantinople, and the Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church began de iure its existence

25.02.1923

Bishop — Warsawtoday: Warsaw city pov., Masovia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.10.09]
⋄ Russian Orthodox Church ⋄ St Alexander Nevsky OR cathedral church — chirotony, i.e. bishop's ordination; nominated on 09.02.1923 by the Synod of the Orthodox Church in Poland

10.1922 – 02.1923

hegumen–superior — Vilniustoday: Vilnius city dist., Vilnius Cou., Lithuania
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.06]
⋄ Holy Spirit OR stavropegial monastery — also: administrator of the Vilnius Eparchy, chairman of the Consistory in Vilnius

08.1922 – 10.1922

rector — Warsawtoday: Warsaw city pov., Masovia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.10.09]
⋄ St Alexander Nevsky OR cathedral church — after arriving in 07.1922 in independent Poland; also: chairman of the Orthodox Consistory in Warsaw

1920 – 1922

resident — (Serbia territory)today: Serbia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]
 — emigrant, after the defeat of the White forces in the civil war with the Bolsheviks

c. 05.1919 – 1920

chaplain — Volunteer Army, Armed Forces of South Russia (anti–bolshevik White movement) — chaplain and dean of the cavalry, nominated by the Provisional Church Higher Authority in Southeast Russia

03.1919 – c. 05.1919

hegumen–superior — PinskPinsk 4th district
today: Pinsk city dist., Brest reg., Belarus

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.07.16]
⋄ Fraternal Epiphany monastery

03.1919

Archimandrite, i.e. superior abbot — Russian Orthodox Church — dignity conferment

c. 12.1917 – c. 03.1919

chaplain — Volunteer Army, Armed Forces of South Russia (anti–bolshevik White movement)

21.09.1916 – 1917

lecturer — Stavropoltoday: Stavropol city reg., Stavropol Krai, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]
⋄ Orthodox Theological Seminary — also: dean of the monasteries of the Stavropol eparchy (till 1916 Stavropol–Ekaterinodar, from 1916 Caucasus–Stavropol)

19.10.1915 – 21.09.1916

deputy inspector — Stavropoltoday: Stavropol city reg., Stavropol Krai, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]
⋄ Orthodox Theological Seminary

1915

hermit — Sosnivkatoday: Sosnivka hrom., Hlukhiv rai., Sumy, Ukraine
more on
ru.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]
⋄ OR stavropegial Hermitage (Glinsk)

02.1914 – 1915

representative — Urmiaalso: Orumiyeh
today: Urmia cou., West Azerbaijan prov., Iran

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]
⋄ Russian Orthodox Church mission

06.12.1913

hieromonk — Russian Orthodox Church — priesthood ordination

21.07.1912

hierodeacon — Kalugatoday: Kaluga city reg., Kaluga oblast, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.09.24]
⋄ Russian Orthodox Church — deacon ordination, preceded by the adoption of the tonsure and perpetual monastic vows on 20.07.1912

1910 – 1914

student — Sankt Petersburgtoday: Saint Petersburg city, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
⋄ philosophy and theology, Orthodox Theological Academy — postgraduate specialised studies crowned with Sacred Orthodox Theology Candidate's degree

till 1910

student — Odessatoday: Odessa urban hrom., Odessa rai., Odessa, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.02.04]
⋄ philosophy and theology, Orthodox Theological Seminary

others related
in death

KULHAWIECClick to display biography Simeon, STEPANIUKClick to display biography George, GUDKOClick to display biography Basil (Bp Ambrose), NIKATOWClick to display biography Alex, OSTROUMOWClick to display biography Michael (Bp Seraphim), SAWICKIClick to display biography Yaroslav, SIENKIEWICZClick to display biography Alex, GAGALUKClick to display biography Anthony (Abp Onuphrius), STROCIUKClick to display biography Leontius, BLUMOWICZClick to display biography John, SZACHMUĆClick to display biography Roman (Fr Seraphim), PANASIEWICZClick to display biography Emilian, MIEDWIEDIUKClick to display biography Vladimir, SMOLENIECClick to display biography Alexander (Abp Arsenius), BORZAKOWSKIClick to display biography Alexander (Abp Agapit), DIERNOWClick to display biography Anatol (Abp Abramius)

murder sites
camp 
(+ prisoner no)

OzerLag: Special Russian complex of concentration camps and forced labour camp for political prisoners in Irkutsk region, functioning with Gulag system. Founded in Tayshet in Siberia on 21.02.1958 with a decision of Russian murderous interior ministry MVD (replacing BratskLag, among others). Initially known as OssobLag no 7. The prisoners slaved at Baykal–Amur railway line — initially Tayshet–Bratsk part, and then Bratsk–Ust’–Kut (c. 700 km altogether). In 1952 c. 37,000 — 40,000 prisoners slave there (a quarter of them were women). The camp system was in operation till 1960. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.04.04]
, gulagmuseum.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.11.14]
)

Gulag: The acronym Gulag comes from the Rus. Главное управление исправительно–трудовых лагерей и колоний (Eng. Main Board of Correctional Labor Camps). The network of Russian concentration camps for slave labor was formally established by the decision of the highest Russian authorities on 27.06.1929. Control was taken over by the OGPU, the predecessor of the genocidal NKVD (from 1934) and the MGB (from 1946). Individual gulags (camps) were often established in remote, sparsely populated areas, where industrial or transport facilities important for the Russian state were built. They were modeled on the first „great construction of communism”, the White Sea–Baltic Canal (1931‑1932), and Naftali Frenkel, of Jewish origin, is considered the creator of the system of using forced slave labor within the Gulag. Up to 12 mln prisoners were held there at one time, i.e. c. 5% of Russia's population. In his book „The Gulag Archipelago”, Alexander Solzhenitsyn estimated that c. 60 mln people were killed in the Gulag until 1956. Formally dissolved on 20.01.1960. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.05.09]
, en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.05.09]
)

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the World War II in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so–called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro–Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called «Intelligenzaktion», in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

Polish-Russian war of 1919—1921: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik–like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
)

sources

personal:
pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.09.24]
, drevo-info.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.09.24]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, www.pstbi.ccas.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.09.24]

bibliographical:
Hierachy, clergy and employees of the Orthodox Church in the 19th‑21st centuries within the borders of the Second Polish Republic and post–war Poland”, Fr Gregory Sosna, M. Antonine Troc-Sosna, Warsaw–Bielsk Podlaski 2017,
original images:
nne.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.09.24]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, nne.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.09.24]
, nne.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.09.24]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, www.youtube.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, commons.wikimedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
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LETTER to CUSTODIAN/ADMINISTRATOR

If you have an Email client on your communicator/computer — such as Mozilla Thunderbird, Windows Mail or Microsoft Outlook, described at WikipediaPatrz:
en.wikipedia.org
, among others  — try the link below, please:

LETTER to CUSTODIAN/ADMINISTRATORClick and try to call your own Email client

If however you do not run such a client or the above link is not active please send an email to the Custodian/Administrator using your account — in your customary email/correspondence engine — at the following address:

EMAIL ADDRESS

giving the following as the subject:

MARTYROLOGY: MARCENKO Alexander

To return to the biography press below:

Click to return to biographyClick to return to biography