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    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

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    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
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WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

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  • WOLSKI Francis, source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOWOLSKI Francis
    source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org
    own collection

surname

WOLSKI

forename(s)

Francis (pl. Franciszek)

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Churchmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Gniezno and Poznań archdiocese (aeque principaliter)more on
www.archpoznan.pl
[access: 2012.11.23]

date and place of death

08.01.1945

Częstochowatoday: Częstochowa city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]

details of death

After German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the II World War, after start of German occupation, arrested on 15.02.1940 by the Germans.

Interned in a Goruszki transit camp.

Next on 02.04.1940 moved to Lubiń transit camp and on 22.04.1940 to KL Posen (Fort VII) concentration camp.

After some time released but deported to a German‑run General Governorate, where perished just before Russian army approach (Russians captured Częśtochowa from Germans on 16‑17.01.1945, during so‑called winter offensive).

cause of death

exile

perpetrators

Germans

date and place of birth

05.09.1877

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

10.02.1907 (Gnieznotoday: Gniezno urban gm., Gniezno pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
)

positions held

1920 – 1940

parish priest {parish: Słupia Kapitulnatoday: Rawicz gm., Rawicz pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
, St Catherine the Virgin and Martyr; dean.: Jutrosintoday: Jutrosin gm., Rawicz pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.19]
}

1918 – 1920

administrator {parish: Lubińtoday: Krzywiń gm., Kościan pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
, Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary; dean.: Gostyńtoday: Gostyń gm., Gostyń pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
}

1914 – 1918

administrator {parish: Solec Kujawskitoday: Solec Kujawski gm., Bydgoszcz pow., Kuyavia–Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
, St Stanislaus the Bishop and Martyr; dean.: Gniewkowotoday: Gniewkowo gm., Inowrocław pow., Kuyavia–Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.27]
}

1907 – 1914

vicar {parish: Skalmierzycetoday: Nowe Skalmierzyce gm., Ostrów Wielkopolski pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.07.16]
, St Catherine of Alexandria the Virgin and Martyr; dean.: Ołoboktoday: Sieroszewice gm., Ostrów Wielkopolski pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
}

1907

vicar {parish: Kcyniatoday: Kcynia gm., Nakło nad Notecią pow., Kuyavia–Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
, St Michael the Archangel; dean.: Kcyniatoday: Kcynia gm., Nakło nad Notecią pow., Kuyavia–Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
}

till 1907

student {Gnieznotoday: Gniezno urban gm., Gniezno pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, philosophy and theology, Archbishop's Practical Theological Seminary (Lat. Seminarium Clericorum Practicum)}

student {Poznańtoday: Poznań city pow., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
, philosophy and theology, Archbishop's Theological Seminary (Collegium Leoninum)}

others related in death

ADAMSKIClick to display biography Ignatius, BINEKClick to display biography Silvester, DĄBROWSKIClick to display biography Steven, DUDZIŃSKIClick to display biography Stanislaus, GIEBUROWSKIClick to display biography Vaclav Casimir, GRASZYŃSKIClick to display biography Alphonse, HAŁASClick to display biography Anthony, HEYDUCKIClick to display biography Ceslaus, KAŹMIERSKIClick to display biography Boleslaus, KRUSZKAClick to display biography Steven, MICHALSKIClick to display biography Stanislaus, PANEWICZClick to display biography Roman, PANKOWSKIClick to display biography Peter Romualdo Casimir, ROSENBERGClick to display biography Louis, SOŁTYSIŃSKIClick to display biography Romualdo, ŚPIKOWSKIClick to display biography Marian, TACZAKClick to display biography Theodore, THEINERTClick to display biography Roman Sigismund, WIERZCHACZEWSKIClick to display biography Maximilian, ZWOLSKIClick to display biography Steven, BAJEROWICZClick to display biography Adalbert Stanislaus, KANIEWSKIClick to display biography Zbigniew, NIKLEWICZClick to display biography Ceslaus Stanislaus, PACEWICZClick to display biography Vaclav, STEINMETZClick to display biography Paul, ZALEWSKIClick to display biography Edward

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

General Governorate: A separate administrative territorial region set up by the Germans in 1939 after defeat of Poland, which included German‑occupied part of Polish territory that was not directly incorporate into German state. Created as the result of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, in a political sense, was to recreate the German idea of 1915 (after the defeat of the Russians in the Battle of Gorlice in 05.1915 during World War I) of establishing a Polish enclave within Germany (also called the General Governorate at that time). It was run by the Germans till 1945 and final Russian offensive, and was a part of so–called Big Germany — Grossdeutschland. Till 31.07.1940 formally known as Germ. Generalgouvernement für die besetzten polnischen Gebiete (Eng. General Governorate for occupied Polish territories) — later as simply niem. Generalgouvernement (Eng. General Governorate). From 07.1941 expanded to include district Galicia. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.04]
)

Deportations from niem. Reichsgau Wartheland: After defeating Poland in 1939 a new province was created in Germany, Germ. Reichsgau Wartheland (Eng. Warta German Region) and defined as „indigenous German”, although in 1939 Germans constituted less than 10% of the total population there. In the same 1939, the national–socialist leader of Germany, Adolf Hitler, announced the need to move Germans from the East to the Reich, mainly to the Germ. Reichsgau Wartheland. Another German leader, Robert Ley, stated, „In 50 years there will be a thriving German country where there will be neither a Pole nor a Jew! If someone asks me where they will be, I will answer: I don't know. In Palestine or in the Sahara desert, I don't care. But German people will live here!” Deportations began. By the end of 1939, c. 80 railway transports were sent to the General Governorate — a total of 87,883 people, mainly Poles and Jews. By 03.1941, over 280,000 people had been displaced. The deported had the right to take with them 12‑30 kg per person. They were given half an hour to pack. Over 60,000 Germans from Estonia, Latvia, Finland, later from other regions, were brought in to replace them. In 1941, c. 70,000 remaining Jewsa were displaced. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2022.11.20]
)

KL Posen: German Posen — Fort VII — camp founded in c. 10.10.1939 in Poznań till mid of 11.1939 operated formally as KL Posen concentration camp (Germ. Konzentrationslager), and this term is used throughout the White Book, also later periods. It was first such a concentration camp set up by the Germans on Polish territory — in case of Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) directly incorporated into German Reich. In 10.1939 in KL Posen for the first time Germans used gas to murder civilian population, in particular patients of local psychiatric hospitals. From 11.1939 the camp operated as German political police Gestapo prison and transit camp (Germ. Übergangslager), prior to sending off to concentration camps, such as KL Dachau or KL Auschwitz. In 28.05.1941 the camp was rebranded as police jail and slave labour corrective camp (Germ. Arbeitserziehungslager). At its peak up to 7‑9 executions were carried in the camp per day, there were mass hangings of the prisoners and some of them were led out to be murdered elsewhere, outside of the camp. Altogether in KL Posen Germans exterminated approx. 20,000 inhabitants of Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) region, including many representatives of Polish intelligentsia, patients and staff of psychiatric hospitals and dozen or so Polish priests. Hundreds of priests were held there temporarily prior to transport to other concentration camps, mainly KL Dachau. From 03.1943 the camp had been transformed into an industrial complex (from 25.04.1944 — Telefunken factory manufacturing radios for submarines and aircrafts). (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.27]
)

Lubiń: At the Benedictine abbey in Lubiń near Kościan, at the beginning of 1940, the Germans organized an temporary internment camp for priests and monks from Greater Poland. E.g. in 04.1941 Franciscan friars from Goruszki monastery were brought in. In total, 104 clergymen were held in the monastery. On 06.10.1941, as part of the third great operation of arrests of the Polish clergy of Greater Poland — more precisely, from the Germ. Reichsgau Wartheland province (Eng. Warta Country District), established in the German–occupied Greater Poland — all interned priests were transported to the KL Dachau concentration camp. Religious brothers were allowed to return to their family homes. The monastery was turned into an old people's home, and later as a training center for national–socialist German youth, Hitler–Jugend. Rich library collections and other goods were plundered. The Benedictines returned to the monastery on 25.01.1945, after the German defeat. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.10]
)

Goruszki: The Goruszki Franciscan monastery in Miejska Górka from 15.02.1940 became a place of internment for priests from neighboring counties — before sending them to German concentration camps. On 01.04.1941, the Germans took over the monastery, transporting all the internees to the camp in Lubin. They turned the monastery buildings into a prison (a branch of the prison in Rawicz). It became the place of execution of hundreds of Poles — there are 453 graves of the murdered in the monastery cemetery. The prison functioned until 1945 and the fall of Germany. (more on: www.franciszkanie-goruszki.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
)

02-03.1940 arrests (Warthegau): First large wave of arrests in 1940 of Polish clergy from German occupied Warthegau region (Greater Poland), started in fact in 01.1940 but the largest numbers of priest were held in 02‑03.1940. In accordance with a plan of „Ohne Gott, ohne Religion, ohne Priesters und Sakramenten” — „without God, without religion, without priest and sacrament” — drafted by the Gaulaiter of Warthegau, Artur Greiser, few hundred of Polish priests were interned in transit camps in Puszczykowo, Bruczków, Goruszki, Chludowo and KL Posen (Fort VII) concentration camp prior to transfer to concentration camps deep within Germany.

Intelligenzaktion: (Eng. „Action Intelligentsia”) — extermination program of Polish elites, mainly intelligentsia, executed by the Germans right from the start of the occupation in 09.1939 till around 05.1940, mainly on the lands directly incorporated into Germany but also in the so‑called General Governorate where it was called AB‑aktion. During the first phase right after start of German occupation of Poland implemented as Germ. Unternehmen „Tannenberg” (Eng. „Tannenberg operation”) — plan based on proscription lists of Poles worked out by (Germ. Sonderfahndungsbuch Polen), regarded by Germans as specially dangerous to the German Reich. List contained names of c. 61,000 Poles. Altogether during this genocide Germans methodically murdered c. 50,000 teachers, priests, landowners, social and political activists and retired military. Further 50,000 were sent to concentration camps where most of them perished. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.10.04]
)

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so–called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro–Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

sources

personal:
www.wtg-gniazdo.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.10]
, www.slupiakapitulna.cba.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.10]
, www.straty.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.10.30]

bibliograhical:, „Martyrology of the Polish Roman Catholic clergy under nazi occupation in 1939‑1945”, Victor Jacewicz, John Woś, vol. I‑V, Warsaw Theological Academy, 1977‑1981,
original images:
www.wtg-gniazdo.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.10]

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