• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

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  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory), source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory), source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory) - 10.1933, source: commons.wikimedia.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    10.1933
    source: commons.wikimedia.org
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory), source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory), source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory), source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory), source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory), source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory), source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory) - contemporary icon, source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    contemporary icon
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory) - contemporary icon, source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    contemporary icon
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory) - contemporary icon, source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    contemporary icon
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory) - contemporary icon, source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    contemporary icon
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory) - contemporary icon, source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    contemporary icon
    source: www.liturgia.cerkiew.pl
    own collection

religious status

saint

surname

PERADZE

forename(s)

Gregory (pl. Grzegorz)

forename(s)
versions/aliases

Grigol

religious forename(s)

Gregory (pl. Grzegorz)

  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory) - Commemorative plague, Bakurciche, Georgia, source: dzieje.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    Commemorative plague, Bakurciche, Georgia
    source: dzieje.pl
    own collection
  • PERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory) - Commemorative plaque, John Klimak orthodox church, Warsaw, source: pl.wikipedia.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERADZE Gregory (Fr Gregory)
    Commemorative plaque, John Klimak orthodox church, Warsaw
    source: pl.wikipedia.org
    own collection

canonisation date

19.09.1995

Ilia II Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgiamore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.22]

function

religious cleric

creed

Eastern Orthodox Churchmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Orthodox Patriarchate of Constantinoplemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]

academic distinctions

Doctor of History
Sacred Orthodox Theology MA

honorary titles

Order of National Hero (Georgia)more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]

nationality

Georgian

date and place
of death

06.12.1942

KL Auschwitzconcentration camp
today: Oświęcim, Oświęcim gm., Oświęcim pov., Lesser Poland voiv., Poland

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.09]

details of death

In 1919 drafted for two year service into Georgian army.

Took part in Georgia defense war against Russians (ending in defeat).

In 1921 for a time in hiding.

After German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the World War II, after start of German occupation, did not leave occupied Warsaw (as a foreigner had a chance to leave).

Turned down an offer to lecture at the University of Berlin.

Worked as a translator (the University was closed down by the Germans).

Arrested on 05.05.1942 by the Germans — prob. as a result of a denunciation by pro–German Georgians of spying activities for Great Britain; earlier, in 01.1941, the so‑called Caucasian Committee (Germ. Kaukasische Vetrauenstelle), an organization intended to represent the interests of the Caucasian diaspora towards the German occupier; it is also possible that the reason for the arrest was the activity among the soldiers of the Eastern Legions (Germ. Legionen der Ostvölker), i.e. volunteer, collaborative armed formations of soldiers from the Caucasus and Central Asia, serving in the German army.

Held in Pawiak prison in Warsaw.

In 10.1941 transferred from the cellar cells to the „working unit” ‑ prob. was used as an interpreter and translator.

In 11.1942 transported to KL Auschwitz concentration camp.

There prob. volunteered to die in place of another inmate: led out together with the prisoners of three other barracks into the freezing cold, where they were to remain until the confession of the person who previously was supposed to steal the bread — then he stepped out of line.

Hounded and murdered after being doused with gasoline and set on fire.

alt. details of death

According to another version, he voluntarily volunteered to die in the gas chamber in place of his fellow prisoner – the father of the family.

cause of death

extermination: exhaustion and starvation

perpetrators

Germans

date and place
of birth

13.09.1899

Bakurcichetoday: Gurjaani mun., Kakheti reg., Georgia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]

religious vows

18.04.1931 (permanent)

presbyter (holy orders)
ordination

25.05.1931 (Orthodox St Stephen cathedral in Parismore on
pl.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.19]
)

positions held

1933 – 1939

deputy professor {Warsawtoday: Warsaw city pov., Masovia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.10.09]
, patrology, Orthodox Theology Department, [University of Warsaw /from 1945/, University — clandestine, underground /1939‑45/, Joseph Piłsudski University /1935‑39/, University of Warsaw /1915‑35/, Imperial University of Warsaw /1870–1915/]}, lecturer in patrology and history of Georgian monasticism; also: tutor of the departmental Theologians Circle; collaborator of the Oriental Commission of the Warsaw Scientific Society; collaborator of the Polish Library of the Fathers of the Church; participant of scientific trips, e.g. to the Holy Land, Syria, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Austria, Italy and Athos (1935); discoverer of Georgian palimpsests from the 6th‑7th centuries (in 1936 in the Holy Land) and the Greek text of the lives of the holy martyrs of Vilnius (on Athos)

05.01.1934

Archimandrite, i.e. superior abbot {Orthodox Patriarchate of Constantinople}, dignity conferment

1931 – 1939

parish priest {church: Paristoday: Paris dep., Île–de–France reg., France
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.13]
, Orthodox church St Nino}, function held also after 1933, after starting work in Warsaw; also: occasional lectures in Paris and Oxford, guest lectures in Dublin and Kraków (1933)

25.05.1931

hieromonk {church: Paristoday: Paris dep., Île–de–France reg., France
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.13]
, Orthodox cathedral St Stephen; Orthodox Patriarchate of Constantinople}, priesthood ordination

19.04.1931

hierodeacon {church: Londontoday: London Cou., England, United Kingdom, Orthodox cathedral St Sophie; Orthodox Patriarchate of Constantinople}, deacon ordination, preceded by the adoption of the tonsure and perpetual monastic vows on 18.04.1931

1927 – c. 1931

scientist {Bonntoday: Bonn urban dist., North Rhine–Westphalia state, Germany
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.10.21]
, history, Frederick William Rhenish University}, teacher of Armenian and Georgian languages, and then a private lecturer; also: researcher of Georgian manuscripts in Graz, Austria (c. 1930), co‑founder of the St Nino Georgian parish in the jurisdiction of the Patriarchate of Constantinople in Paris (1929)

1926 – 1927

scientist {Etterbeektoday: Brussels capital mun., Brussels–Capital reg., Belgium
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.07.16]
, St Michael College, Bollandist Society Research Institute and Library}, also: participant of the lectures at the Catholic University of Louvain, researcher of Georgian manuscripts at the British Museum in London and the Bodlean Library in Oxford

1925 – 1926

PhD student {Bonntoday: Bonn urban dist., North Rhine–Westphalia state, Germany
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.10.21]
, history, Frederick William Rhenish University}, PhD thesis „History of Georgian monasticism from its beginning to 1064. A contribution to the history of Eastern monasticism”, public defense in 1926

1922 – 1925

student {Berlintoday: Berlin state, Germany
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
, Department of Theology, Humboldt University /from 1949/, Friedrich Wilhelm University /1829‑1945/, University of Berlin /1809‑1828/}, specialized studies, crowned in 1925with the title of master of sacred Orthodox theology, preceded by a 5‑month German language course

1918 – 1921

student {Tiflistoday: Tbilisi, Georgia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.27]
, philology, State University TSU}, also: teacher in the village of Zemo–Tschangaki near Gori (till 1919) and Manavi (c. 1921), with a break for two years of military service

1913 – 1918

student {Tiflistoday: Tbilisi, Georgia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.27]
, philosophy and theology, Orthodox Theological Seminary}, initially prob. a minor seminary student at the high school level

polyglot, author of at least 119 published texts, including c. 70 scientific publications, in various languages, including: Germ. „Im Dienste der georgischen Kultur (1926‑1940)” (Eng. „In Service of Georgian culture (1926‑1940)”, 1940; „Apocryphal letter of Dionysius the Areopagite to Timothy, Bishop of Ephesus, about the martyrdom of the apostles Peter and Paul”, Warsaw, 1937; „Biography of Shota Rustaveli”, 1937; „Unknown apocryphal Gospel coming from monophysite circles”, Warsaw, 1935; „Acts of the martyrs”, Warsaw 1934; „Documents concerning the discovery and text of the Codex Sinaiticus”, Warsaw 1934; „The concept, tasks and methods of patrolling in Orthodox theology”, Warsaw, 1934; Germ. „Die altchristliche Literatur in der georgischen Überlieferung” (Eng. „Early Christian Literature in the Georgian Tradition”, Leipzig, 1932

others related
in death

BAZYLUKClick to display biography James (monk Ignatius), HOLCClick to display biography Nicholas, KOROBCZUKClick to display biography Lew, MARTYSZClick to display biography Basil, OHRYZKOClick to display biography Peter, SZWAJKOClick to display biography Paul, ZACHARCZUKClick to display biography Sergius

murder sites
camp 
(+ prisoner no)

KL Auschwitz: German KL Auschwitz concentration camp (Germ. Konzentrationslager) and death camp (Germ. Vernichtungslager) camp was set up by Germans around 27.01.1940 n. Oświęcim, on the German territory (initially in Germ. Provinz Schlesien — Silesia Province; and from 1941 Germ. Provinz Oberschlesien — Upper Silesia Province). Initially mainly Poles were interned. From 1942 it became the centre for holocaust of European Jews. Part of the KL Auschwitz concentration camps’ complex was death camp (Germ. Vernichtungslager) KL Auschwitz II Birkenau, located not far away from the main camp. There Germans murder possibly in excess of million people, mainly Jews, in gas chambers. Altogether In excess of 400 priests and religious went through the KL Auschwitz, approx. 40% of which were murdered (mainly Poles). (more on: www.meczennicy.pelplin.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.07.06]
)

Pawiak: Investigative prison in Warsaw, built by the Russian occupiers of Poland in 1830‑5. During the Poland partition's period, a Russian investigative prison, both criminal and political. During World War II and the German occupation, the largest German prison in the General Government. Initially, it was subordinate to the Justice Department of the General Governorate, and from 03.1940 Germ. Sicherheitspolizei und des Sicherheitsdienst (Eng. Security Police and Security Service) of the Warsaw District — in particular the German Secret Political Police Gestapo. c. 3,000 prisoners were kept in Pawiak permanently, of which about 2,200 in the men's unit and c. 800 in the women's unit (the so‑called Serbia) — with a „capacity” of c. 1,000 prisoners. In total, in the years 1939–1944, c. 100,000 Poles passed through the prison, of which c. 37,000 were murdered in executions — from 10.1943 Pawiak prisoners were murdered in open executions on the streets of Warsaw (sometimes several times a day) — during interrogations, in cells or in a prison „hospital”, and c. 60,000 were taken in 95 transports to concentration camps (mainly KL Auischwitz), other places of isolation or to forced labor. The prison Germans demolished during the Warsaw Uprising in 08‑10.1944. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2022.08.17]
)

General Governorate: A separate administrative territorial region set up by the Germans in 1939 after defeat of Poland, which included German‑occupied part of Polish territory that was not directly incorporate into German state. Created as the result of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, in a political sense, was to recreate the German idea of 1915 (after the defeat of the Russians in the Battle of Gorlice in 05.1915 during World War I) of establishing a Polish enclave within Germany (also called the General Governorate at that time). It was run by the Germans till 1945 and final Russian offensive, and was a part of so–called Big Germany — Grossdeutschland. Till 31.07.1940 formally known as Germ. Generalgouvernement für die besetzten polnischen Gebiete (Eng. General Governorate for occupied Polish territories) — later as simply niem. Generalgouvernement (Eng. General Governorate). From 07.1941 expanded to include district Galicia. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.04]
)

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the World War II in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so–called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro–Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

sources

personal:
pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.02.15]
,
original images:
www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, commons.wikimedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, www.liturgia.cerkiew.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, dzieje.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
, pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.05.19]

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