• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

po polskuKliknij by wyświetlić to bio po polsku

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  • ŻYLIŃSKI Boleslav - 1937, Ludwipol, source: www.nawolyniu.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOŻYLIŃSKI Boleslav
    1937, Ludwipol
    source: www.nawolyniu.pl
    own collection
  • ŻYLIŃSKI Boleslav; source: Mary Pawłowiczowa (ed.), Fr Joseph Krętosz (ed.), „Biographical lexicon of Lviv Roman Catholic Metropoly clergy victims of the II World War 1939—1945”, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOŻYLIŃSKI Boleslav
    source: Mary Pawłowiczowa (ed.), Fr Joseph Krętosz (ed.), „Biographical lexicon of Lviv Roman Catholic Metropoly clergy victims of the II World War 1939—1945”
    own collection

surname

ŻYLIŃSKI

forename(s)

Boleslav (pl. Bolesław)

  • ŻYLIŃSKI Boleslav - Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg, source: ipn.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOŻYLIŃSKI Boleslav
    Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg
    source: ipn.gov.pl
    own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church RCmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Lutsk diocesemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

Lutsk‐Zhytomyr diocese (aeque principaliter)more on
www.catholic-hierarchy.org
[access: 2021.12.19]

date and place
of death

04.1940

Kuropatyforest complex
today: on the border of Minsk, Barauliany ssov., Minsk dist., Minsk city reg., Belarus

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]

alt. dates and places
of death

18.09.1939, 05.1940, 1940

Volodymyr‐Volynskyitoday: Volodymyr, Volodymyr urban hrom., Volodymyr rai., Volyn, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]

details of death

After Polish–Russian war of 1919‐1921 sent to Russia, where ministered clandestinely in a few abandoned parishes in northern part of Lutsk and Zhytomyr dioceses.

Organised illegal crossing of Poles from Communist Russia to the–then independent Poland.

On 12.02.1926 arrested by the Russians and jailed in Olewsk.

On 06.08.1926 in Korosten n. Zhytomyr sentenced to death for spying.

In Ovruch incarcerated in death cell for 4 months (when on 09.09.1926 an executioner who was supposed to carry out the sentence arrived in Ovruch his father got a heart attack and died) and then notified of suspension of the sentence with a possibility however of carrying it out at short notice.

In such state held for 4 years and 8 months in Czernihiv prison.

On 13.03.1930 transported to Moscow jail and next on 28.06.1930 moved out to ITL SLON concentration camp — lager — on Solovetsky Islands.

Did not reach it though for on 21.07.1930 escaped from a transit camp n. Arkhangelsk and on 11.09.1930, after 6–weeks long escape during which a number of times had his clothes shot through by pursuers, crossed the border to Poland.

After Russian invasion of Poland on 17.09.1939 (Germans invaded Poland 17 days earlier) and start of the World War II left his parish, reached Hrubieszów, but next day decided to come back.

The same day, on 18.09.1939, apprehended by a Russian soldier in Volodymyr–Volynskyi.

Disappeared without trace — his name is on the so‐called „Belarus Polish holocaust list” (part of Katyn murders).

alt. details of death

According to some theories murdered right after apprehension by a Russian soldier.

cause of death

mass murder

perpetrators

Russians

date and place
of birth

30.10.1894

Lyubachtoday: Byerazino ssov., Byerazino dist., Minsk reg., Belarus
more on
be.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.08.05]

presbyter (holy orders)
ordination

28.02.1920 (Lutsktoday: Lutsk city rai., Volyn, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
)

positions held

1937 – 1939

parish priest — Ludwipoltoday: Sosnove, Sosnove hrom., Rivne rai., Rivne, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.09]
⋄ Sacred Heart of Jesus RC parish ⋄ Koretstoday: Korets urban hrom., Rivne rai., Rivne, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.19]
RC deanery

1930 – 1937

parish priest — Povorsktoday: Povorsk hrom., Kovel rai., Volyn, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.07.05]
⋄ Sacred Heart of Jesus RC parish ⋄ Koveltoday: Kovel urban hrom., Kovel rai., Volyn, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.19]
RC deanery

author of „Memoirs of the Antichrist State

c. 1925 – 1926

administrator — Olevsktoday: Olevsk urban hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ Exaltation of the Holy Cross RC parish ⋄ Ovruchtoday: Ovruch urban hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
RC deanery

c. 1925 – 1926

administrator — Velidnykytoday: Novi Velidnyky, Slovechno hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
⋄ Holy Trinity RC parish ⋄ Ovruchtoday: Ovruch urban hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
RC deanery — acting („ad interim”)

1920 – c. 1923

administrator — Velidnykytoday: Novi Velidnyky, Slovechno hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
⋄ Holy Trinity RC parish ⋄ Ovruchtoday: Ovruch urban hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
RC deanery

c. 1923

administrator — Olevsktoday: Olevsk urban hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ Exaltation of the Holy Cross RC parish ⋄ Ovruchtoday: Ovruch urban hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
RC deanery — acting („ad interim”)

1920 – 1926

priest — Ovruchtoday: Ovruch urban hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish ⋄ Ovruchtoday: Ovruch urban hrom., Korosten rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
RC deanery

1920 – 1926

priest — Labun'today: Novolabun, Polonne urban hrom., Shepetivka rai., Proskuriv/Khmelnytskyi, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
⋄ Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish ⋄ Zaslavtoday: Iziaslav urban hrom., Shepetivka rai., Proskuriv/Khmelnytskyi, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
RC deanery

till 1920

student — Tarnówtoday: Tarnów city pov., Lesser Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.06.07]
⋄ philosophy and theology, Theological Seminary

from 1917

student — Zhytomyrtoday: Zhytomyr urban hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ philosophy and theology, Theological Seminary

1915 – 1917

student — Sankt Petersburgtoday: Saint Petersburg city, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
⋄ philosophy and theology, Metropolitan Theological Seminary

others related
in death

CIEŚLAClick to display biography Felix, JASTRZĘBSKIClick to display biography Stanislav, KUREKClick to display biography Stanislav, MALINOWSKIClick to display biography Clement, STANISŁAWSKIClick to display biography Steven, SZCZERBICKIClick to display biography Fabian, SZUMOWSKIClick to display biography Marian Richard, ŻURAWSKIClick to display biography Ceslav

murder sites
camp 
(+ prisoner no)

Kuropaty: In 1940 Russians executed prob. in Minsk on 17 Lenin Str. and buried in Kuropaty n. Minsk unknown number of Poles (POWs). On the so‐called „Belarusian Katyn list” — confirmed by the so‐called „disposal letters” sent in 04‐05.1940 by the 1st Special Department of the NKVD in Moscow regarding the transport of Polish prisoners of war to places of execution: 9 of these lists concern prisoners from Belarus — 3,870 names were recorded (according to some sources 4,465) and the prisoners were brought from NKVD prisons, among others from Brest (c. 1,500 people), Pinsk (c. 500), Baranavichy (c. 450). This was a fulfillment of Russian Commie‐Nazi government decision — Political Bureau of the Russian Commie‐Nazi party of 05.03.1940 — to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and individuals held in Russian POW camps following Ribbentrop‐Molotov German‐Russian accord and annexation of half of Poland into Russia, confirmed by the order No.00350 of the head of the NKVD, Mr Lavrentyi Beria, on the „discharge of NKVD prisons” in Ukraine and Belarus. There are indications — i.e. 4 so‐called „NKVD‐Gestapo Methodical Conferences” of 1939‐1940: in Brześć on Bug, Przemyśl, Zakopane and Cracow — of close collaboration between Germans and Russians in realization of plans of total extermination of Polish nation, its elites in particular — decision that prob. was confirmed during meeting of socialist leaders of Germany: Mr Heinrich Himmler, and Russia: Mr Lavrentyi Beria, in another German leader’s hunting lodge: Mr Hermann Göring, in Rominty in Romincka Forest in East Prussia. Kuropaty is the place of death of up to 250,000 of victims (1937‐1941). To this day, neither the Russians nor the Belarusians have released detailed protocols of this genocide in their possession. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.01.17]
, pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.10]
)

«Katyn genocide 1940»: On 05.03.1940, the Russian Commie‐Nazi authorities — the Politburo of the Russian Communist Party — made a formal decision to exterminate tens of thousands of Polish intelligentsia and military personnel held in Russian camps as a consequence of the German‐Russian Ribbentrop‐Molotov Agreement, the invasion of Poland and the annexation of half of Poland in 09.1939, and the beginning of World War II. The implementing act was order No. 00350 of the head of the NKVD, Mr Lavrentyi Beria, on the „discharge of NKVD prisons” in Ukraine and Belarus. The entire action — the murders were committed, among others, in Katyn, Kharkov, Tver, Bykovnia and Kuropaty — was coordinated centrally from the NKVD headquarters in Moscow. This is evidenced by the so‐called deportation lists of subsequent groups of Polish prisoners (usually about 100 people) from NKVD camps sent to places of execution, prepared and distributed a few days before the executions from Moscow. It is also evidenced by the earlier deportations of Polish priests from the Kozelsk, Ostashkov and Starobilsk NKVD camps to NKVD prison in Moscow, or their isolation, just before Christmas on 25.12.1939, prob. in order to deprive Polish prisoners of spiritual care at that time — clearly actions controlled from the NKVD HQ in Moscow. There are indications — i.e. four so‐called „NKVD‐Gestapo Methodical Conferences” of 1939‐1940: in Brest on Bug, Przemyśl, Zakopane and Cracow — of close collaboration between Germans and Russians in realization of plans of total extermination of Polish nation, its elites in particular — decision that prob. was confirmed during meeting of socialist leaders of Germany: Mr Heinrich Himmler, and Russia: Mr Lavrentyi Beria, in another German leader, Mr Hermann Göring, hunting lodge in Rominty in Romincka Forest in East Prussia. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.12.15]
)

Ribbentrop‐Molotov: Genocidal Russian‐German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the World War II in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so‐called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro‐Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti‐Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislav Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German‐Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called «Intelligenzaktion», in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian‐German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

Pius XI's encyclicals: Facing the creation of two totalitarian systems in Europe, which seemed to compete with each other, though there were more similarities than contradictions between them, Pope Pius XI issued in 03.1937 (within 5 days) two encyclicals. In the „Mit brennender Sorge” (Eng. „With Burning Concern”) published on 14.03.1938, condemned the national socialism prevailing in Germany. The Pope wrote: „Whoever, following the old Germanic‐pre‐Christian beliefs, puts various impersonal fate in the place of a personal God, denies the wisdom of God and Providence […], whoever exalts earthly values: race or nation, or state, or state system, representatives of state power or other fundamental values of human society, […] and makes them the highest standard of all values, including religious ones, and idolizes them, this one […] is far from true faith in God and from a worldview corresponding to such faith”. On 19.03.1937, published „Divini Redemptoris” (Eng. „Divine Redeemer”), in which criticized Russian communism, dialectical materialism and the class struggle theory. The Pope wrote: „Communism deprives man of freedom, and therefore the spiritual basis of all life norms. It deprives the human person of all his dignity and any moral support with which he could resist the onslaught of blind passions […] This is the new gospel that Bolshevik and godless communism preaches as a message of salvation and redemption of humanity”… Pius XI demanded that the established human law be subjected to the natural law of God , recommended the implementation of the ideal of a Christian state and society, and called on Catholics to resist. Two years later, National Socialist Germany and Communist Russia came together and started World War II. (more on: www.vatican.vaClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.05.28]
, www.vatican.vaClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.05.28]
)

Arkhangelsk: Russian forced labour camp for prisoners and POWs. At the same time center of many Russian concentration camp, part of Gulag archipelago of camps, e.g. ITL Yagrinlag, KargopolLag, PPLp KotlasLag, OnetLag. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.17]
)

ITL SLON: Russian Rus. Исправи́тельно‐Трудово́й Ла́герь (Eng. Corrective Labor Camp) ITL Rus. Солове́цкий ла́герь осо́бого назначе́ния Ла́герь (Eng. Solovetsky Special Purpose Camp) SLON — concentration and slave forced labor camp (within what was to become Gulag complex) — headquartered in Solovetsky Islands in Arkhangelsk Oblast. Founded on 13.10.1923 in a famous Orthodox monastery. In the 1920s, one of the first and largest concentration camps in Russia. The place of slave labor of prisoners — at forest felling, sawmills, peat extraction, fishing, loading work on the Murmansk Railway Main Line, in road construction, production of food and consumer goods, at the beginning of the construction of the White Sea ‐ Baltic canal, etc. The concept of the later system of Russian Gulag concentration camps prob. had its origins in the Solovetsky Islands camp — from there the idea spread to the camps in the area covered by the construction of the White Sea ‐ Baltic canal, i.e. ITL BelBaltLag, and from there further, to the entire territory of the Russian state. From the network of camps on the Solovetsky Islands — also called the Solovetsky Islands archipelago — prob. also comes the concept of the „Gulag Archipelago” created by Alexander Solzhenitsyn. It is estimated that tens to hundreds of thousands of prisoners passed through the Solovetsky Islands concentration camps. At its peak, c. 72,000 prisoners were held there: e.g. 14,810 (12.1927); 12,909 (03.1928); 65,000 (1929); 53,123 (01.01.1930); 63,000 (01.06.1930); 71,800 (01.01.1931); 15,130 (1932); 19,287 (1933) — c. 43,000 of whom were murdered, including the years 1937‐1938 when c. 9,500 prisoners were transported from the camp and murdered in several places of mass executions, including Sandarmokh, Krasny Bor and Lodeynoye Polye. Among them were many Catholic and Orthodox priests. After the National Socialist Party came to power in Germany in 1933, a German delegation visited the ITL SLON camp, to „inspect” Russian solutions and adopt them later in German concentration camps. It operated until 04.12.1933, with a break from 16.11.1931 to 01.01.1932, when it was part of and later became a subcamp of the ITL BelBaltLag camp. It operated as such until 1939 (from 1936 as a prison). (more on: old.memo.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2024.04.08]
)

Moscow (Butyrki): Harsh transit and interrogation prison in Moscow — for political prisoners — where Russians held and murdered thousands of Poles. Founded prob. in XVII century. In XIX century many Polish insurgents (Polish uprisings of 1831 and 1863) were held there. During Communist regime a place of internment for political prisoners prior to a transfer to Russian slave labour complex Gulag. During the Great Purge c. 20,000 inmates were held there at any time (c. 170 in every cell). Thousands were murdered. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.05.01]
)

Polish‐Russian war of 1919‐1921: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik‐like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
)

sources

personal:
www.klub-generalagrota.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.01.06]
, katolicy1844.republika.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, bc.wbp.lodz.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.04.23]
, www.katolicy.euClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, www.cprdip.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.05.19]
, be.convdocs.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.17]

bibliographical:
Biographical lexicon of Lviv Roman Catholic Metropoly clergy victims of the II World War 1939‐1945”, Mary Pawłowiczowa (ed.), Fr Joseph Krętosz (ed.), Holy Cross Publishing, Opole, 2007
Lexicon of Polish clergy repressed in USSR in 1939‐1988”, Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, ed. Science Society KUL, 2003, Lublin
Fate of the Catholic clergy in USSR 1917‐1939. Martyrology”, Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, ed. Science Society KUL, 2003, Lublin
original images:
www.nawolyniu.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.10.05]
, ipn.gov.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.02.02]

LETTER to CUSTODIAN/ADMINISTRATOR

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MARTYROLOGY: ŻYLIŃSKI Boleslav

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