• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

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  • SZWAJNOCH Steven, source: encyklo.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZWAJNOCH Steven
    source: encyklo.pl
    own collection
  • SZWAJNOCH Steven - c. 01.09.1942, KL Auschwitz, concentration camp's photo; source: Archives of Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oświęcim (www.auschwitz.org), own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZWAJNOCH Steven
    c. 01.09.1942, KL Auschwitz, concentration camp's photo
    source: Archives of Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oświęcim (www.auschwitz.org)
    own collection
  • SZWAJNOCH Steven - c. 01.09.1942, KL Auschwitz, concentration camp's photo; source: Archives of Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oświęcim (www.auschwitz.org), own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZWAJNOCH Steven
    c. 01.09.1942, KL Auschwitz, concentration camp's photo
    source: Archives of Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oświęcim (www.auschwitz.org)
    own collection
  • SZWAJNOCH Steven - c. 01.09.1942, KL Auschwitz, concentration camp's photo; source: Archives of Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oświęcim (www.auschwitz.org), own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZWAJNOCH Steven
    c. 01.09.1942, KL Auschwitz, concentration camp's photo
    source: Archives of Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oświęcim (www.auschwitz.org)
    own collection

surname

SZWAJNOCH

forename(s)

Steven (pl. Stefan)

  • SZWAJNOCH Steven - Commemorative plaque, St Mary Magdalene church, Chorzów Stary - Chorzów, source: commons.wikimedia.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZWAJNOCH Steven
    Commemorative plaque, St Mary Magdalene church, Chorzów Stary - Chorzów
    source: commons.wikimedia.org
    own collection
  • SZWAJNOCH Steven - Commemorative plaque, Christ the King cathedral, Katowice, source: www.miejscapamiecinarodowej.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZWAJNOCH Steven
    Commemorative plaque, Christ the King cathedral, Katowice
    source: www.miejscapamiecinarodowej.pl
    own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Churchmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Katowice diocesemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

Wrocław diocesemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

honorary titles

Papal chamberlainmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.11.22]

Gold „Cross of Merit”more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2019.04.16]

Minor Canonmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.11.14]
(Katowice cathedral)

date and place of death

24.03.1945

KL Bergen-Belsenconcentration camp
today: n. Bergen, Celle dist., Lower Saxony state, Germany

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.09]

details of death

When studying theology in Wrocław collaborated with the clandestine Polish Youth Union „Zet”, part of clandestine National League, main aim of which was independence of Poland.

Was also the last chairman of clandestine „Swoi” (Eng. „Ours”) unit, founded on „Zet” organisation's initiative.

In 1916 moved from a parish in Upper Silesia to a ministry in Berlin — prob. as result of his pro–Polish stance.

In 1919‑21, after Poland regained independence in 11.1918, during preparations for a plebiscite that was to decide national destiny of Upper Silesia and Opole region supported his Polish cause.

Spoke publically at Polish political demonstrations and started to organize structures of working groups for future Polish administration.

In 06.1922 survived German thugs attack on his rectory in Zabrze. Moved to Tychy.

After German invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the World War II his name prob. was included in German Germ. „Sonderfahndungsbuch Polen” (Eng. „Special book of wanted Poles”).

Hunted by Gestapo, arrested and jailed in Katowice prison.

In 02.1940 released but deported to German‑run General Governorate.

There he was, among others, interpreter in Kielce Curia and chaplain to the bishop, Czesław Kaczmarek.

In 09.1942 arrested in Kielce — apparently as a result of map discovered during search of his premises with Polish borders stretching far to the west marke by him.

On 01.09.1942 transported to KL Auschwitz concentration camp.

From there in 1944 transferred to KL Sachsenhausen concentration camp and finally prob. in a so‑called „death march” to KL Bergen–Belsen concentration camp where perished.

cause of death

extermination: exhaustion

perpetrators

Germans

date and place of birth

31.08.1888

Bielszowicetoday: district of Ruda Śląska, Ruda Śląska city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.10]

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

22.06.1912 (Wrocławtoday: Wrocław city pow., Lower Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.04.02]
)

positions held

1938 – 1940

parish priest {parish: Katowicetoday: Katowice city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.12]
, cathedral Christ the King}

from 1937

canon of the chapter {church: Katowicetoday: Katowice city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.12]
, cathedral Christ the King}

from 1937

clerk {Katowicetoday: Katowice city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.12]
, Office, the Bishop; dioc.: Katowice}

from 1938

president {Katowicetoday: Katowice city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.12]
, Mission Council; dioc.: Katowice}

from 1937

church assistant {Katowicetoday: Katowice city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.12]
, Catholic Action Diocesan Institute DIAK; dioc.: Katowice}

from 1937

curator {Katowicetoday: Katowice city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.12]
, Congregation of the Sisters of Mary the Immaculate}

1925 – 1938

parish priest {parish: Chorzówtoday: Chorzów Stary district of Chorzów /from 1934/, Chorzów city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, St Mary Magdalene; dean.: Chorzówform.: Królewska Huta /till 1934
today: Chorzów city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2010.08.11]
}

till c. 1938

director {Katowicetoday: Katowice city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.12]
, Missionary Union of the Clergy; dioc.: Katowice}

from 1931

membership {Katowicetoday: Katowice city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.12]
, Administative Council (łac. Consilium Administrationis); dioc.: Katowice}

till 1922

parish priest {parish: Zabrzetoday: Zabrze city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.04.02]
, St Anne; dean.: Zabrzetoday: Zabrze city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.04.02]
}

organizer {Królewska Hutatoday: Chorzów /from 1934/, Chorzów city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, Polish education}

1922 – 1925

visitor / inspector of religion science {Królewska Hutatoday: Chorzów /from 1934/, Chorzów city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, people's and secondary schools}

from 1917

vicar {parish: Kluczborktoday: Kluczbork gm., Kluczbork pow., Opole voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2010.08.11]
, Blessed Virgin Mary, Help of Christians; dean.: Bogacicatoday: Kluczbork gm., Kluczbork pow., Opole voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.04.02]
}

1916 – 1917

vicar {parish: Berlintoday: Berlin state, Germany
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
, St Michael; dean.: Berlintoday: Berlin state, Germany
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
}

1912 – 1916

vicar {parish: Królewska Hutatoday: Chorzów /from 1934/, Chorzów city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, St Hedwig of Silesia; dean.: Królewska Hutatoday: Chorzów /from 1934/, Chorzów city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
}

1912

vicar {parish: Chróścicetoday: Dobrzeń Wielki gm., Opole pow., Opole voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.04.02]
, St Hedwig of Silesia}

1908 – 1912

student {Wrocławtoday: Wrocław city pow., Lower Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.04.02]
, philosophy and theology, Department of Theology, University of Wrocław (since 1945), Royal University — Breslau Academy (1816‑1911), Frederic Wilhelm University of Silesia (1911–1945)}

activist {political and social}

others related in death

FLORKOClick to display biography Joseph, GRZĄDKAClick to display biography Hippolytus, MACIERZYŃSKIClick to display biography Paul, MAKIELAClick to display biography Theodore Francis, ORGANISZCZAKClick to display biography Vladislav

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

KL Bergen-Belsen: Till 1944 Bergen‑Belsen was a prisoner‑of‑war camp, in 1944 was changed into a concentration camp, in 1945 in so‑called „death marches” thousands of prisoners from other concentration camps were transferred, approx. 50,000 of them died in Bergen‑Belsen. When the camp on 15.04.1945 was liberated by the British troops c. 13,000 unburied bodies were found together with c. 60,000 inmates, emaciated, starving, without a food or drink for days, suffering from illness and sickness, mainly typhoid. C. 14,000 of them perished in next two months without regaining strength and health. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.03.10]
)

KL Sachsenhausen: In KL Sachsenhausen concentration camp, set up in the former Olympic village in 07.1936, hundreds of Polish priests were held in 1940, before being transported to KL Dachau. Some of them perished in KL Sachsenhausen. Murderous medical experiments on prisoners were carried out in the camp. In 1942‑4 c. 140 prisoners slaved at manufacturing false British pounds, passports, visas, stamps and other documents. Other prisoners also had to do slave work, for Heinkel aircraft manufacturer, AEG and Siemens among others. On average c. 50,000 prisoners were held at any time. Altogether more than 200,000 inmates were in jailed in KL Sachsenhausen and its branched, out of which tens of thousands perished. Prior to Russian arrival mass evacuation was ordered by the Germans and c. 80,000 prisoners were marched west in so‑called „death marches” to other camps, i.e. KL Mauthausen–Gusen and KL Bergen–Belsen. The camp got liberated on 22.04.1945. After end of armed hostilities Germans set up there secret camp for German prisoners and „suspicious” Russian soldiers. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2018.11.18]
)

KL Auschwitz (prisoner no: 62541Click to display biography): German KL Auschwitz concentration camp (Germ. Konzentrationslager) and death camp (Germ. Vernichtungslager) camp was set up by Germans around 27.01.1940 n. Oświęcim, on the German territory (initially in Germ. Provinz Schlesien — Silesia Province; and from 1941 Germ. Provinz Oberschlesien — Upper Silesia Province). Initially mainly Poles were interned. From 1942 it became the centre for holocaust of European Jews. Part of the KL Auschwitz concentration camps’ complex was death camp (Germ. Vernichtungslager) KL Auschwitz II Birkenau, located not far away from the main camp. There Germans murder possibly in excess of million people, mainly Jews, in gas chambers. Altogether In excess of 400 priests and religious went through the KL Auschwitz, approx. 40% of which were murdered (mainly Poles). (more on: www.meczennicy.pelplin.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.07.06]
)

Kielce: The prison at Zamkowa Str. in Kielce was opened in 1826‑8. In 09.1939, after start of German occupation, under German control. Initially a POW camp and next prison run by German political police Gestapo. Till 1945 more then c. 16,000 prisoners were held there. Any time c. 2,000 were incarcerated, in space build for c. 400 people. Prisoners, in extremely cramped conditions, were starved, ill–treated and murdered in prison, executed outside, transported to German concentration camps or deported to slave labour sites. Prison chapel Germans used as torture chamber. At the same time in 08.1941 (after German attack on 22.06.1941 of their erstwhile ally, Russians, do till the autumn of 1944 in Fijałkowski’s barracks in Kielce Bukówka district Germans set up a POW camp for Russian prisoners (branch of Stalag XII C „Kamienna” in Skarżysko–Kamienna, later of Stalag 367 Częstochowa). According to one of the witnesses first 100 POWs were brought in 09.1941. A week later 4,500 more arrived and within a fortnight another 5,000. Following that the POWs were brought in groups of 500‑1,000. Altogether c. 15,000‑20,000 Russian POWs were held in the camp. POWs slaved at forest clearances, digging sewage ditches, at train loading. They got a hunger rations (as a result acts of cannibalism took place). Slept in unheated barracks. Were beaten and tortured (with wooden battons). Received to medical help. For any type of transgression they were penalized with execution. The camp was managed by the Germans and was supported by a camp’s militia, composed mainly by the Ukrainians. Only few hundred prisoners survived who in the autumn of 1944 were transferred to other camps. From 1945 in Russian Commie–Nazi hands. Till 1956 many political prisoners, e.g. members of former restistance Home Army AK and National Armed Forces NSZ (part of Polish Clandestine State) where held camptive there. On 04‑05.1945 Polish partisans commanded by Mjr Anthony Heda attacked the prison and release c. 700 prisoners. (more on: www.chroniclesofterror.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.02.08]
)

General Governorate: A separate administrative territorial region set up by the Germans in 1939 after defeat of Poland, which included German‑occupied part of Polish territory that was not directly incorporate into German state. Created as the result of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, in a political sense, was to recreate the German idea of 1915 (after the defeat of the Russians in the Battle of Gorlice in 05.1915 during World War I) of establishing a Polish enclave within Germany (also called the General Governorate at that time). It was run by the Germans till 1945 and final Russian offensive, and was a part of so–called Big Germany — Grossdeutschland. Till 31.07.1940 formally known as Germ. Generalgouvernement für die besetzten polnischen Gebiete (Eng. General Governorate for occupied Polish territories) — later as simply niem. Generalgouvernement (Eng. General Governorate). From 07.1941 expanded to include district Galicia. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.04]
)

Katowice (prison): Detention centre run by Germans and later, in 1945, took over by the Commie–Nazis.

Intelligenzaktion Schlesien: A planned action of arrests and extermination of Polish Upper Silesia intellectual elite in general recorded in a proscription list called „Sonderfahndungsbuch Polen” — participants of Upper Silesia uprisings, former Polish plebiscite activists, journalists, politicians, intellectuals, civil servants, priests — organised by Germans mainly in 04‑05.1940, aiming at total Germanisation of the region. The relevant decree, no IV–D2–480/40, was issued by the RSHA, i.e. Germ. Reichssicherheitshauptamt (Eng. Reich Security Office), and signed by Heinrich Himmler or Reinhard Heydrich. Some of those arrested were murdered in mass executions, some were deported to the German–run General Governorate, and some were sent to concentration camps. The personal details of 3,047 people deported within two months of 1940 were established. Among the victims were 33 Catholic priests, 22 of whom perished in concentration camps (the clergy were sent — in 5 transports — first to KL Dachau, and then to KL Gusen, where they slaved in quarries). Altogether, the Germans murdered c. 2,000 members of the Polish Upper Silesia intellectual elite. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.05.30]
)

Intelligenzaktion: (Eng. „Action Intelligentsia”) — extermination program of Polish elites, mainly intelligentsia, executed by the Germans right from the start of the occupation in 09.1939 till around 05.1940, mainly on the lands directly incorporated into Germany but also in the so‑called General Governorate where it was called AB‑aktion. During the first phase right after start of German occupation of Poland implemented as Germ. Unternehmen „Tannenberg” (Eng. „Tannenberg operation”) — plan based on proscription lists of Poles worked out by (Germ. Sonderfahndungsbuch Polen), regarded by Germans as specially dangerous to the German Reich. List contained names of c. 61,000 Poles. Altogether during this genocide Germans methodically murdered c. 50,000 teachers, priests, landowners, social and political activists and retired military. Further 50,000 were sent to concentration camps where most of them perished. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.10.04]
)

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so–called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro–Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

Silesian Uprisings: Three armed interventions of the Polish population against Germany in 1919‑21 aiming at incorporation of Upper Silesia and Opole region into Poland, after the revival of the Polish state in 1918. Took place in the context of a plebiscite ordered on the basis of the international treaty of Versailles of 28.06.1919, ending the First World War, that was to decide national fate of the disputed lands. The 1st Uprising took place on 16‑24.08.1919 and broke out spontaneously in response to German terror and repression against the Polish population. Covered mainly Pszczyna and Rybnik counties and part of the main Upper Silesia industrial district. Suppressed by the Germans. 2nd Uprising took place on 19‑25.08.1920 in response to numerous acts of terror of the German side. Covered the entire area of the Upper Silesia industrial district and part of the Rybnik county. As a result Poles obtained better conditions for the campaign prior the plebiscite. The poll was conducted on 20.03.1921. The majority of the population — 59.6% — were in favor of Germany, but the results were influenced by the admission of voting from former inhabitants of Upper Silesia living outside Silesia. As a result the 3rd Uprising broke out, the largest such uprising of the Silesian in the 20th century. It lasted from 02.05.1921 to 05.07.1921. Spread over almost the entire area of Upper Silesia. Two large battles took place in the area of St. Anna Mountain and near Olza. As a result on 12.10.1921 the international plebiscite commission decided on a more favorable for Poland division of Upper Silesia. The territory granted to Poland was enlarged to about ⅓ of the disputed territory. Poland accounted for 50% of metallurgy and 76% of coal mines. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.05.25]
)

sources

personal:
encyklo.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.05.30]
,
original images:
encyklo.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.05.30]
, www.auschwitz.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2018.11.18]
, www.auschwitz.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2018.11.18]
, www.auschwitz.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2018.11.18]
, commons.wikimedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.12.01]
, www.miejscapamiecinarodowej.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.01.06]

LETTER to CUSTODIAN/ADMINISTRATOR

If you have an Email client on your communicator/computer — such as Mozilla Thunderbird, Windows Mail or Microsoft Outlook, described at WikipediaPatrz:
en.wikipedia.org
, among others  — try the link below, please:

LETTER to CUSTODIAN/ADMINISTRATORClick and try to call your own Email client

If however you do not run such a client or the above link is not active please send an email to the Custodian/Administrator using your account — in your customary email/correspondence engine — at the following address:

EMAIL ADDRESS

giving the following as the subject:

MARTYROLOGY: SZWAJNOCH Steven

To return to the biography press below:

Click to return to biographyClick to return to biography