• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

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  • NOWAK Edmund, source: www.muzeumkatynskie.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    source: www.muzeumkatynskie.pl
    own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund, source: episkopat.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    source: episkopat.pl
    own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund, source: www.muzeumkatynskie.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    source: www.muzeumkatynskie.pl
    own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund, source: www.ogrodywspomnien.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    source: www.ogrodywspomnien.pl
    own collection

surname

NOWAK

forename(s)

Edmund

  • NOWAK Edmund - Commemorative plaque, Łokietek Park, Włocławek, source: www.skyscrapercity.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, Łokietek Park, Włocławek
    source: www.skyscrapercity.com
    own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund - Commemorative plaque, Exaltation of the Holy Cross church, Poznań, source: ipn.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, Exaltation of the Holy Cross church, Poznań
    source: ipn.gov.pl
    own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund - Commemorative plaque, Polish War Cemetery, Miednoye, source: www.moremaiorum.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, Polish War Cemetery, Miednoye
    source: www.moremaiorum.pl
    own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund - Commemorative plaque, monument, Wąwolnica, source: radio.lublin.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, monument, Wąwolnica
    source: radio.lublin.pl
    own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund - Commemorative plaque, Exultation of the Holy Cross monastery, Kalwaria Pacławska, source: ofm.krakow.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, Exultation of the Holy Cross monastery, Kalwaria Pacławska
    source: ofm.krakow.pl
    own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection
  • NOWAK Edmund - Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg, source: ipn.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg
    source: ipn.gov.pl
    own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church RCmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Włocławek diocesemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

Włocławek ie. Kalisz diocese
Military Ordinariate of Polandmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.12.20]

academic distinctions

Doctor of History
Philosopy MA

honorary titles

War Order of Virtuti Militari — Silver (5th Class)more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2019.10.13]

September Campaign Crossmore on
pl.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.11.24]

Officer's Cross „Polonia Restitutamore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2019.04.16]

Cross of Valor of the former Volunteer Allied Army of General Stanislav Bułak–Bałachowicz
Gold „Cross of Meritmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2019.04.16]

Medal „Poland To Its Defender
Ten Years of Independence Medalmore on
pl.wikipedia.org
[access: 2019.10.13]

date and place
of death

04.1940

Tvertoday: Tver oblast, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.10.09]

alt. dates and places
of death

05.1940

details of death

In 1917, during World War I, while serving in Działoszyn, cooperated with the clandestine Polish Military Organization POW — Działoszyn was then under Austro–Hungarian occupation, in the Germ. Militärgeneralgouvernement in Polen (Eng. General Military Government in Poland), right next to border with the area occupied by Germany, i.e. the Germ. Kaiserlich–deutsche Generalgouverment Warschau (Eng. Imperial–German General Government of Warsaw).

After the end of World War I and Poland regaining independence, volunteered on 05.05.1919 for the Polish Army (accepted on 01.06.1919).

During Polish–Russian war of 1920 chaplain–volunteer of the 3rd Uhlans Cavarly Regiment fighting on the northern front.

During German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the World War II head of chaplaincy at „Lublin” Army of the Polish Forces (from mobilization in 08.1939).

Prob. till 14.09.1939 remained in Lublin, together with Regional Corps DOK no II HQ, and then left — together with a DOK No. II commander, Gen. Mieczyslav Smorawiński — in accordance with orders towards Kovel, and following that to Volodymyr‐Volynskyi.

When after 17.09.1939 Russian invading troops reached Volodymyr‐Volynskyi prob. intended — as a result of an accord with Russians negotiated by Gen. Smorawiński — to move with his troops west, towards Bug river.

On 20.09.1939 however, when leaving Volodymyr‐Volynskyi apprehended with Polish troops by Russians and „interned” in NKVD filtration camp PFL Shepetivka.

From there transported east, to Kozelsk concentration camp (or Starobilsk camp).

On 23‐24.12.1939 moved prob. to Butyrki prison in Moscow and on 29.12.1939 to Ostashkov concentration camp.

From Ostashkov — his name is on the NKVD deportation list No. 05/3 prepared on 05.04.1940, item 71 (case No. 1331), with an order to be placed at the disposal of the head of the NKVD Directorate in Tver — deported prob. in 04.1940 (the date is unknown, but judging by the date of preparation of the deportation list, deportation took place — as in other known cases — shortly thereafter) to the execution site in Tver and murdered.

By Polish Minister of Defence’s decision No. 439/MON of 05.10.2007 posthumously promoted to the rank of colonel.

Gen. Smorawiński was murdered by the Russians in Katyn forest.

cause of death

mass murder

perpetrators

Russians

date and place
of birth

03.12.1891

Półwiosek Starytoday: Ślesin gm., Konin pov., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]

alt. dates and places
of birth

02.12.1891

presbyter (holy orders)
ordination

22.03.1915 (Włocławek cathedral)

positions held

1939

dean — Command of the Corps District DOK No. II Lublin, Polish Armed Forces

19.03.1939

RC military pastor — Polish Armed Forces — in the lieutenant colonel rank

1934 – 1939

administrator — Lublintoday: Lublin city pov., Lublin voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.20]
⋄ Command of the Corps District DOK No. II Lublin, Polish Armed Forces ⋄ Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish

till 1934

PhD student — Lvivtoday: Lviv urban hrom., Lviv rai., Lviv, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
⋄ history, John Casimir University [i.e. clandestine John Casimir University (1941‐1944) / Ivan Franko University (1940‐1941) / John Casimir University (1919‐1939) / Franciscan University (1817‐1918)] — PhD thesis „ Outline of the history of military pastoral care in Poland in the years 968‐1831”, public defense in 1934 (first version published earlier, in 1932)

06.1934

RC senior military chaplain — Polish Armed Forces — in major rank, with seniority from 01.01.1934

till c. 1934

administrator — Naujoji Vilniatoday: district of Vilnius, Vilnius city dist., Vilnius Cou., Lithuania
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
⋄ Command of the Corps District DOK No. III Grodno, Polish Armed Forces ⋄ St Stanislav Kostka the Confessor RC military parish

till c. 1930

student — Vilniustoday: Vilnius city dist., Vilnius Cou., Lithuania
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.06]
⋄ history, Stephen Batory University [i.e. Vilnius University (from 1945) / some faculties acting clandestinely (1939‐1945) / closed by Lithuanians (1939) / Stephen Batory University (1919‐1939)] — postgraduate specialised studies crowned with Philosophy Master's degree

c. 1923 – 1924

administrator — Zolochivtoday: Zolochiv urban hrom., Zolochiv rai., Lviv, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.19]
⋄ Command of the Corps District DOKNo. VI Lviv, Polish Armed Forces ⋄ St Michael the Archangel RC military parish

c. 1923

chaplain — Ternopiltoday: Ternopil urban hrom., Ternopil rai., Ternopil, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.20]
⋄ Command of the Corps District DOKNo. VI Lviv, Polish Armed Forces

chaplain — Vawkavysktoday: Vawkavysk dist., Grodno reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.06]
⋄ Command of the Corps District DOK No. III Grodno, Polish Armed Forces

from 1921

chaplain — Grodnotoday: Grodno dist., Grodno reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
⋄ Command of the Corps District DOK No. III Grodno, Polish Armed Forces

05.1920

RC military chaplain — Polish Armed Forces — commissioned, with seniority, in captain rank

from 01.06.1919

chaplain — Polish Armed Forces — non–commissioned (reserve) chaplain

1918 – 1920

vicar — Brzeźnioform.: Brzeźno
today: Brzeźnio gm., Sieradz pov., Łódź voiv., Poland

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.01]
⋄ St Giles RC parish ⋄ Złoczewtoday: Złoczew gm., Sieradz pov., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.16]
RC deanery

1917 – 1918

vicar — Działoszyntoday: Działoszyn gm., Pajęczno pov., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.11]
⋄ St Mary Magdalene RC parish ⋄ Wieluń / Praszkadeanery names/seats
today: Poland
RC deanery

1916 – 1917

vicar — Dłutówtoday: Dłutów gm., Pabianice pov., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.01]
⋄ St Three Kings RC parish ⋄ Łasktoday: Łask gm., Łask pov., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.01]
RC deanery

1916

vicar — Włocławektoday: Włocławek city pov., Kuyavia‐Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
⋄ St John the Baptist RC parish (main parish)Włocławektoday: Włocławek city pov., Kuyavia‐Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
RC deanery — prefect

1915

vicar — Aleksandrów Kujawskitoday: Aleksandrów Kujawski gm., Aleksandrów Kujawski pov., Kuyavia‐Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.16]
⋄ Transfiguration of the Lord RC church ⋄ Służewotoday: Aleksandrów Kujawski gm., Aleksandrów Kujawski pov., Kuyavia‐Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.16]
, St John the Baptist RC parish ⋄ Nieszawatoday: Nieszawa gm., Aleksandrów Kujawski pov., Kuyavia‐Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.05]
RC deanery — also: prefect of elementary schools

1909 – 1915

student — Włocławektoday: Włocławek city pov., Kuyavia‐Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
⋄ philosophy and theology, Theological Seminary

author of historical works, incl. monumental „Outline of the history of military pastoral care in Poland in the years 968‐1831” (Warsaw, 1932)

others related
in death

DUBIELClick to display biography Alexander, JANASClick to display biography Mieczyslav, KACPRZAKClick to display biography Joseph, MARCOŃClick to display biography Mieczyslav, MASŁOŃClick to display biography Vladislav, MIKUCZEWSKIClick to display biography Joseph, MIODUSZEWSKIClick to display biography John, OCHABClick to display biography Vladimir, PASZKOClick to display biography Richard, ROMANOWSKIClick to display biography Victor, SKORELClick to display biography Joseph, SZWEDClick to display biography Bronislav, WOJTYNIAKClick to display biography Ceslav, ZAKRZEWSKIClick to display biography Francis

murder sites
camp 
(+ prisoner no)

Tver (NKWD murders 1940): On 04.04‐22.05.1940 the Russians executed in Tver c. 6,314 Polish prisoners of war (POW) kept in Ostaszkov concentration camp. The prisoners were brought — Tver is c. 190 km from Ostashkov — to the NKVD HQ building (now Tver Medical Institute at Sovetskaya Str., formerly classical gymnasium) identified one by one in a basement room known as the „Lenin’s room”, handcuffed, taken to another room cellar with a door covered with felt, and then murdered by a shot from a German Walther P38 pistol into the back of the head. The bodies where next dumped into mass graves in ditches in the Miednoje forest, in the NKVD summer resort, and covered with sand by an excavator. The murders were part of an organized Russian genocidal operation against Polish prisoners of war, bearing all the hallmarks of genocide, known as the «Katyn genocide». (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]
, en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.05.09]
)

«Katyn genocide 1940»: On 05.03.1940, the Russian Commie‐Nazi authorities — the Politburo of the Russian Communist Party — made a formal decision to exterminate tens of thousands of Polish intelligentsia and military personnel held in Russian camps as a consequence of the German‐Russian Ribbentrop‐Molotov Agreement, the invasion of Poland and the annexation of half of Poland in 09.1939, and the beginning of World War II. The implementing act was order No. 00350 of the head of the NKVD, Mr Lavrentyi Beria, on the „discharge of NKVD prisons” in Ukraine and Belarus. The entire action — the murders were committed, among others, in Katyn, Kharkov, Tver, Bykovnia and Kuropaty — was coordinated centrally from the NKVD headquarters in Moscow. This is evidenced by the so‐called deportation lists of subsequent groups of Polish prisoners (usually about 100 people) from NKVD camps sent to places of execution, prepared and distributed a few days before the executions from Moscow. It is also evidenced by the earlier deportations of Polish priests from the Kozelsk, Ostashkov and Starobilsk NKVD camps to NKVD prison in Moscow, or their isolation, just before Christmas on 25.12.1939, prob. in order to deprive Polish prisoners of spiritual care at that time — clearly actions controlled from the NKVD HQ in Moscow. There are indications — i.e. four so‐called „NKVD‐Gestapo Methodical Conferences” of 1939‐1940: in Brest on Bug, Przemyśl, Zakopane and Cracow — of close collaboration between Germans and Russians in realization of plans of total extermination of Polish nation, its elites in particular — decision that prob. was confirmed during meeting of socialist leaders of Germany: Mr Heinrich Himmler, and Russia: Mr Lavrentyi Beria, in another German leader, Mr Hermann Göring, hunting lodge in Rominty in Romincka Forest in East Prussia. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.12.15]
)

KLW Ostashkov (prisoner no: 1331): Russian Rus. Концентрационный Лагерь для Военнопленных (Eng. POW Concentration Camp) KLW, run by genocidal Russian NKVD organization, for Poles arrested after the invasion in 1939, operating in 1939‐1940 in Ostashkov — in practice on Seliger lake Stolbnoy island and Svetlitsa peninsula, c. 11 km from Ostashkov, in a former Orthodox monastery, Niłowo‐Stołobieńska Hermitage, looted and shut down by Russian Bolsheviks in 1928. In 04.1940 6,570 were held captive there (in 11.1940 — 8397), out of which c. 6,300 were subsequently — as the fulfillment of Russian government decision to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and prisoners of war camps (Polish holocaust) — executed in Tver. Among the victims were officers of the Polish State Police, the Border Protection Corps KOP, Military Police, the Prison Service, officers and soldiers of the Polish Army, intelligence and counterintelligence officers of the Second Department of the General Staff, priests, employees of the judiciary, the fire brigade, foresters and military settlers from the eastern part of the Second Polish Republic. On another island of Lake Seliger, Gorodomla, in 1946‐1953 the Russians held a group of German specialists from Wernher von Braun's team, who, under the direction of Sergei Korolev, worked on Russian missiles. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]
)

Moscow (Butyrki): Harsh transit and interrogation prison in Moscow — for political prisoners — where Russians held and murdered thousands of Poles. Founded prob. in XVII century. In XIX century many Polish insurgents (Polish uprisings of 1831 and 1863) were held there. During Communist regime a place of internment for political prisoners prior to a transfer to Russian slave labour complex Gulag. During the Great Purge c. 20,000 inmates were held there at any time (c. 170 in every cell). Thousands were murdered. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.05.01]
)

KLW Starobilsk: Russian Rus. Концентрационный Лагерь для Военнопленных (Eng. POW Concentration Camp) KLW, run by genocidal Russian NKVD organization, for Poles arrested after the invasion in 1939, operating in 1939‐1940 in Starobilsk — on the premises of the „All Afflicted Joy” Icon of Our Lady Orthodox monastery, looted and closed by Russian Bolsheviks in 1923. In 04.1940 c. 3,800 were kept there (in 11.1939 — 11,262) — per captive there was c. 1.25 m2 of bunk space on which they had to sleep, eat and keep their belongings, initially the receiving only one meal a day. Subsequently— as the fulfillment of Russian government decision to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and prisoners of war camps (Polish holocaust) — were executed in Kharkiv. Among the victims were 8 generals, 55 colonels, 127 lieutenant colonels, 230 majors, c. 1,000 captains, and c. 2,450 lieutenants and second lieutenants of the Polish Army. Almost half were reserve officers: over 20 professors of universities, all without exception scientific staff of the Anti‐Gas Institute of the Polish Army and almost the entire staff of the Institute of Armament of the Polish Army, c. 400 doctors, several hundred lawyers, several hundred engineers, c. 100 teachers, c. 600 pilots , many social activists, several dozen writers and journalists. Used as a concentration camp for Poles later as well. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]
)

KLW Kozelsk: Russian Rus. Концентрационный Лагерь для Военнопленных (Eng. POW Concentration Camp) KLW, run by genocidal Russian NKVD organization, for Poles arrested after the invasion in 1939, operating in 1939‐1940 in Kozelsk — on the premises of the 18th century Orthodox Stauropygial Introduction of the Mother of God into the Temple Optyn Monastery, shut down and robbed by the Russian Bolsheviks in 1923. In 04‐05.1940, c. 4,594 people were detained there, who were then — as part of the implementation of the decision of the Russian authorities to exterminate dozens thousands of Polish intelligentsia and military personnel — murdered in Katyn. The prisoners included one rear admiral of the Polish Navy, four generals, c. 100 colonels and lieutenant colonels, c. 300 majors and c. 1,000 captains and captains of the Polish Army. Around half of them were reserve officers, including: 21 professors, associate professors and lecturers at universities, over 300 doctors, several hundred lawyers, several hundred engineers, several hundred teachers and many writers, journalists and publicists. There was also one woman, 2nd Leutenant pilot Janine Lewandowska. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]
)

NKVD Shepetivka POW camp: Russian Rus. Проверочно‐Фильтрационный Ла́герь (Eng. Testing and Filtration Camp) PFL, where the genocidal Russian NKVD organization carried out selection and isolation of the most „dangerous” or most valuable prisoners — established after the Russian invasion of Poland on 17.09.1939, the establishment of the NKVD Board for Prisoners of War and Internees on 19.09.1939 by the head of the NKVD, Lavrenty Beria, and the order to establish a number of camps for Polish POWs. Operated in 1939‐1940 in Shepetivka, village on the then Polish Ukraine. C. 20,000 prisoners — Polish intelligentsia and soldiers — were held there in extremely harsh conditions: POWs had to sleep on the earth, without food, having to queue few hours for a glass of water. Next POWs were sent to Russian concentration camps and then to mass execution sites. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.04]
)

Ribbentrop‐Molotov: Genocidal Russian‐German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the World War II in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so‐called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro‐Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti‐Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislav Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German‐Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called «Intelligenzaktion», in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian‐German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

Pius XI's encyclicals: Facing the creation of two totalitarian systems in Europe, which seemed to compete with each other, though there were more similarities than contradictions between them, Pope Pius XI issued in 03.1937 (within 5 days) two encyclicals. In the „Mit brennender Sorge” (Eng. „With Burning Concern”) published on 14.03.1938, condemned the national socialism prevailing in Germany. The Pope wrote: „Whoever, following the old Germanic‐pre‐Christian beliefs, puts various impersonal fate in the place of a personal God, denies the wisdom of God and Providence […], whoever exalts earthly values: race or nation, or state, or state system, representatives of state power or other fundamental values of human society, […] and makes them the highest standard of all values, including religious ones, and idolizes them, this one […] is far from true faith in God and from a worldview corresponding to such faith”. On 19.03.1937, published „Divini Redemptoris” (Eng. „Divine Redeemer”), in which criticized Russian communism, dialectical materialism and the class struggle theory. The Pope wrote: „Communism deprives man of freedom, and therefore the spiritual basis of all life norms. It deprives the human person of all his dignity and any moral support with which he could resist the onslaught of blind passions […] This is the new gospel that Bolshevik and godless communism preaches as a message of salvation and redemption of humanity”… Pius XI demanded that the established human law be subjected to the natural law of God , recommended the implementation of the ideal of a Christian state and society, and called on Catholics to resist. Two years later, National Socialist Germany and Communist Russia came together and started World War II. (more on: www.vatican.vaClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.05.28]
, www.vatican.vaClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.05.28]
)

Polish‐Russian war of 1919‐1921: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik‐like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
)

sources

personal:
www.ordynariat.wp.mil.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]
, www.niedziela.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.02.15]
, episkopat.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.10.13]
, www.ogrodywspomnien.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2018.09.02]
, 4historie.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.05.09]

bibliographical:
Victims of German crime among Włocławek diocese clergy”, Fr Stanislav Librowski, „Włocławek Diocese Chronicle”, 07‐08.1947
original images:
www.muzeumkatynskie.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2017.01.21]
, episkopat.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.10.13]
, www.muzeumkatynskie.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2017.01.21]
, www.ogrodywspomnien.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.11.14]
, www.skyscrapercity.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.04]
, ipn.gov.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.12.15]
, www.moremaiorum.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2018.09.02]
, radio.lublin.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2022.05.23]
, ofm.krakow.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2022.05.23]
, www.katedrapolowa.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.01.16]
, ipn.gov.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.02.02]

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