• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

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  • BANSZEL Charles - 23-24.11.1937, Warsaw, source: docplayer.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOBANSZEL Charles
    23-24.11.1937, Warsaw
    source: docplayer.pl
    own collection
  • BANSZEL Charles, source: www.ptew.org.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOBANSZEL Charles
    source: www.ptew.org.pl
    own collection

surname

BANSZEL

forename(s)

Charles (pl. Karol)

  • BANSZEL Charles - Commemorative plaque, Saviour church, Evangelical Cathedral of the Augsburg Confession, Bielsko-Biała, source: www.miejscapamiecinarodowej.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOBANSZEL Charles
    Commemorative plaque, Saviour church, Evangelical Cathedral of the Augsburg Confession, Bielsko-Biała
    source: www.miejscapamiecinarodowej.pl
    own collection

function

pastor

creed

Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Poland EA

diocese / province

Cieszyn seniority (commissariat) / diocesemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2016.04.23]

Military Ordinariate of Polandmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.12.20]

honorary titles

Cross on the Silesian Ribbon of Valor and Merit 1st Class
Silver „Cross of Meritmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2019.04.16]

date and place
of death

06.1941

Lvivtoday: Lviv urban hrom., Lviv rai., Lviv, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]

alt. dates and places
of death

12.1939, 04.1940, 1941

(Russia territory)today: Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.08.05]

Katyntoday: Smolensk reg., Smolensk oblast, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.09.24]

details of death

Participant of Polish–Czech skirmishes in 1919.

Appointed a Polish steward by the Allied Commission in Cieszyn and a member of the Orłowo City Council, but just before the first meeting of the Council, interned by the Czechs and imprisoned with others in the Ostrava prison.

Soon, however, as a result of the intervention of the Allied Commission and the strike of Polish miners in Karviná, released.

From 1919 chaplain of the Polish Army.

During period of decision about the fate of Silesia after World War I Polish activist in 1920‐1 of the Polish Plebiscite Committee in Kluczbork.

During III Silesian Uprising chaplain to the Polish insurgents at Supreme Command of the Insurgent Forces.

Moved to Polish Army reserves in 1921.

From 1931 again chaplain of the Polish Army in major rank.

After German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the World War II, after start of Russian occupation helped in Lviv refugees from Cieszyn Silesia.

Arrested by the Russians prob. in 1939.

Murdered by the Russians as part of genocidal prison murders during panic evacuation from German attack of 22.06.1941 of their erstwhile ally, Russians.

alt. details of death

According to some sources murdered — executed — by the Russians during Christmas in 12.1939 (NKVD Kozielsk camp is being mentioned as a place of his internment and from where was supposed to be transported in unknown direction).

According to yet another in 1939 or 1941 deported to Russia and there perished.

Recently, has also been mentioned as an „unconfirmed” victim of the Russian genocide in Katyn.

cause of death

mass murder

perpetrators

Russians

date and place
of birth

08.03.1890

SvibiceTrans‐Olza
today: part of Český Těšín, Karviná dist., Moravian‐Silesian reg., Czechia

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.02.15]

alt. dates and places
of birth

Mnisztwotoday: part of Cieszyn, Cieszyn pov., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.28]

presbyter (holy orders)
ordination

01.04.1917

positions held

1933 – 1939

chaplain — Lvivtoday: Lviv urban hrom., Lviv rai., Lviv, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
⋄ Evangelical–Augsburg chaplaincy, Command of the Corps District DOKNo. VI Lviv, Polish Armed Forces — senior chaplain, in rank of major (from 01.01.1935); also: pastor of the Evangelical–Augsburg parish and catechist in schools in Lviv

1932 – 1939

chaplain — Przemyśltoday: Przemyśl city pov., Subcarpathia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.04.01]
⋄ Evangelical–Augsburg chaplaincy, Command of the Corps District DOK No. X Przemyśl, Polish Armed Forces — commuting from Lviv

01.08.1931 – 1933

chaplain — Krakówtoday: Kraków city pov., Lesser Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.06.07]
⋄ Evangelical–Augsburg chaplaincy, Command of the Corps District DOK No. V Kraków, Polish Armed Forces — also: pastor of the Evangelical–Augsburg parish in Kraków

1925 – 1930

director — Mławatoday: Mława urban gm., Mława pov., Masovia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
⋄ State Teachers' Seminary

1921 – 1925

director — Ostrzeszówtoday: Ostrzeszów gm., Ostrzeszów pov., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.05.30]
⋄ Evangelical Men's State Teaching Seminary

c. 1922

priest — Pawłówtoday: Sośnie gm., Ostrów Wielkopolski pov., Greater Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.24]

1917 – c. 1920

vicar — OrlováTrans‐Olza
today: Karviná dist., Moravian‐Silesian reg., Czechia

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.07.16]
⋄ EA parish — also: catechist in departmental folk (primary) schools and a Polish gymnasium

1913 – 1917

student — Viennatoday: Vienna state, Austria
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
⋄ philosophy and evangelical theology, Alma Mater Rudolphina Vindobonensis (Eng. University of Vienna), i.e. Rudolphina

publicist, e.g. in „Work Voice”, „Evangelical News” (1921) magazines; translator and editor of the works of Jan Amos Comenius; author of „Commander of the Battalion of the First Brigade Eugene Słomka–Dreszer” brochure, Warsaw 1933

married — four children

comments

According to many sources, on Christmas Eve, 24.12.1939, the Russians transported many priests detained in the camps in Starobilsk and Kozelsk and moved them to Butyrki prison in Moscow.

From there they were transferred, for unknown reasons, to other camps, i.e. to Ostashkov, Starobielsk or Kozielsk, and then murdered respectively in Tver, Kharkov and Katyn.

others related
in death

BAŁUTClick to display biography Anthony (Fr Roman), BUCZYŃSKIClick to display biography Joseph, CZEMERYŃSKIClick to display biography Yaroslav Anthony, KAŹNICAClick to display biography Monica, KNYSZClick to display biography Stephen, KONOPKAClick to display biography Casimir Stanislav, KOWALIKClick to display biography Zeno, KOWERKOClick to display biography Maximilian, MARCHIEWICZClick to display biography Francis (Fr Michael), OSIDACZClick to display biography Roman, PISKOZUBClick to display biography Julia, STOKŁOSAClick to display biography Joseph, ZAWOROTIUKClick to display biography Michael

murder sites
camp 
(+ prisoner no)

06.1941 massacres (NKVD): After German attack of Russian‐occupied Polish territory and following that of Russia itself, before a panic escape, Russians murdered — in accordance with the genocidal order issued on 24.06.1941 by the Russian interior minister Lawrence Beria to murder all prisoners (formally „sentenced” for „counter‐revolutionary activities”, „anti‐Russian acts”, sabotage and diversion, and political prisoners „in custody”), held in NKVD‐run prisons in Russian occupied Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia — c. 40,000‐50,000 prisoners. In addition Russians murdered many thousands of victims arrested after German attack regarding them as „enemies of people” — those victims were not even entered into prisons’ registers. Most of them were murdered in massacres in the prisons themselves, the others during so‐called „death marches” when the prisoners were driven out east. After Russians departure and start of German occupation a number of spontaneous pogroms of Jews took place. Many Jews collaborated with Russians and were regarded as co‐responsible for prison massacres. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
)

Deportations to Siberia: In 1939‐1941 Russians deported — in four large groups in: 10.02.1940, 13‐14.04.1940, 05‐07.1940, 05‐06.1941 — up to 1 mln of Polish citizens from Russian occupied Poland to Siberia leaving them without any support at the place of exile. Thousands of them perished or never returned. The deportations east, deep into Russia, to Siberia resumed after 1944 when Russians took over Poland. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.09.21]
)

«Katyn genocide 1940»: On 05.03.1940, the Russian Commie‐Nazi authorities — the Politburo of the Russian Communist Party — made a formal decision to exterminate tens of thousands of Polish intelligentsia and military personnel held in Russian camps as a consequence of the German‐Russian Ribbentrop‐Molotov Agreement, the invasion of Poland and the annexation of half of Poland in 09.1939, and the beginning of World War II. The implementing act was order No. 00350 of the head of the NKVD, Mr Lavrentyi Beria, on the „discharge of NKVD prisons” in Ukraine and Belarus. The entire action — the murders were committed, among others, in Katyn, Kharkov, Tver, Bykovnia and Kuropaty — was coordinated centrally from the NKVD headquarters in Moscow. This is evidenced by the so‐called deportation lists of subsequent groups of Polish prisoners (usually about 100 people) from NKVD camps sent to places of execution, prepared and distributed a few days before the executions from Moscow. It is also evidenced by the earlier deportations of Polish priests from the Kozelsk, Ostashkov and Starobilsk NKVD camps to NKVD prison in Moscow, or their isolation, just before Christmas on 25.12.1939, prob. in order to deprive Polish prisoners of spiritual care at that time — clearly actions controlled from the NKVD HQ in Moscow. There are indications — i.e. four so‐called „NKVD‐Gestapo Methodical Conferences” of 1939‐1940: in Brest on Bug, Przemyśl, Zakopane and Cracow — of close collaboration between Germans and Russians in realization of plans of total extermination of Polish nation, its elites in particular — decision that prob. was confirmed during meeting of socialist leaders of Germany: Mr Heinrich Himmler, and Russia: Mr Lavrentyi Beria, in another German leader, Mr Hermann Göring, hunting lodge in Rominty in Romincka Forest in East Prussia. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.12.15]
)

KLW Kozelsk: Russian Rus. Концентрационный Лагерь для Военнопленных (Eng. POW Concentration Camp) KLW, run by genocidal Russian NKVD organization, for Poles arrested after the invasion in 1939, operating in 1939‐1940 in Kozelsk — on the premises of the 18th century Orthodox Stauropygial Introduction of the Mother of God into the Temple Optyn Monastery, shut down and robbed by the Russian Bolsheviks in 1923. In 04‐05.1940, c. 4,594 people were detained there, who were then — as part of the implementation of the decision of the Russian authorities to exterminate dozens thousands of Polish intelligentsia and military personnel — murdered in Katyn. The prisoners included one rear admiral of the Polish Navy, four generals, c. 100 colonels and lieutenant colonels, c. 300 majors and c. 1,000 captains and captains of the Polish Army. Around half of them were reserve officers, including: 21 professors, associate professors and lecturers at universities, over 300 doctors, several hundred lawyers, several hundred engineers, several hundred teachers and many writers, journalists and publicists. There was also one woman, 2nd Leutenant pilot Janine Lewandowska. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]
)

Lviv (Brygidki): Penal prison, then at 34 Kazimierzowska Str. in Lviv — in the buildings of the former monastery of the Order of St Brigid, in 1784 — after the first partition of Poland and after the dissolution of the religious orders as part of the so—called Josephine dissolutions — converted by the partitioning Austrian authorities into a prison. In 1939‐1941, the Russians held there thousands of prisoners, most of them Poles. On c. 26.06.1941, in the face of the German invasion and attack of their erstwhile ally, the Russians, during a panic escape (the left Lviv exactly on 26.06.1941), genocideally murdered several thousand prisoners. In 1941‐1944 the prison was run by the Germans and mass murders of Polish, Jewish and Ukrainian civilians took place there. After start of another Russian occupation in 1941 prison in which the executions were carried out on prisoners sentenced to death. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.09.21]
)

Ribbentrop‐Molotov: Genocidal Russian‐German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the World War II in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so‐called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro‐Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti‐Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislav Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German‐Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called «Intelligenzaktion», in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian‐German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

Silesian Uprisings: Three armed interventions of the Polish population against Germany in 1919‐1921 aiming at incorporation of Upper Silesia and Opole region into Poland, after the revival of the Polish state in 1918. Took place in the context of a plebiscite ordered on the basis of the international treaty of Versailles of 28.06.1919, ending the First World War, that was to decide national fate of the disputed lands. The 1st Uprising took place on 16‐24.08.1919 and broke out spontaneously in response to German terror and repression against the Polish population. Covered mainly Pszczyna and Rybnik counties and part of the main Upper Silesia industrial district. Suppressed by the Germans. 2nd Uprising took place on 19‐25.08.1920 in response to numerous acts of terror of the German side. Covered the entire area of the Upper Silesia industrial district and part of the Rybnik county. As a result Poles obtained better conditions for the campaign prior the plebiscite. The poll was conducted on 20.03.1921. The majority of the population — 59.6% — were in favor of Germany, but the results were influenced by the admission of voting from former inhabitants of Upper Silesia living outside Silesia. As a result the 3rd Uprising broke out, the largest such uprising of the Silesian in the 20th century. It lasted from 02.05.1921 to 05.07.1921. Spread over almost the entire area of Upper Silesia. Two large battles took place in the area of St. Anna Mountain and near Olza. As a result on 12.10.1921 the international plebiscite commission decided on a more favorable for Poland division of Upper Silesia. The territory granted to Poland was enlarged to about ⅓ of the disputed territory. Poland accounted for 50% of metallurgy and 76% of coal mines. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.05.25]
)

Silesian Uprisings: Three armed interventions of the Polish population against Germany in 1919‐1921 aiming at incorporation of Upper Silesia and Opole region into Poland, after the revival of the Polish state in 1918. Took place in the context of a plebiscite ordered on the basis of the international treaty of Versailles of 28.06.1919, ending the First World War, that was to decide national fate of the disputed lands. The 1st Uprising took place on 16‐24.08.1919 and broke out spontaneously in response to German terror and repression against the Polish population. Covered mainly Pszczyna and Rybnik counties and part of the main Upper Silesia industrial district. Suppressed by the Germans. 2nd Uprising took place on 19‐25.08.1920 in response to numerous acts of terror of the German side. Covered the entire area of the Upper Silesia industrial district and part of the Rybnik county. As a result Poles obtained better conditions for the campaign prior the plebiscite. The poll was conducted on 20.03.1921. The majority of the population — 59.6% — were in favor of Germany, but the results were influenced by the admission of voting from former inhabitants of Upper Silesia living outside Silesia. As a result the 3rd Uprising broke out, the largest such uprising of the Silesian in the 20th century. It lasted from 02.05.1921 to 05.07.1921. Spread over almost the entire area of Upper Silesia. Two large battles took place in the area of St. Anna Mountain and near Olza. As a result on 12.10.1921 the international plebiscite commission decided on a more favorable for Poland division of Upper Silesia. The territory granted to Poland was enlarged to about ⅓ of the disputed territory. Poland accounted for 50% of metallurgy and 76% of coal mines. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2020.05.25]
)

sources

personal:
old.luteranie.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]
, www.ptew.org.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2017.11.07]
, www.parafia.cieszyn.org.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2017.11.07]
, docplayer.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.03.24]
, www.miejscapamiecinarodowej.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.04]
, www.rodzinakatynska.czClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.03.24]

original images:
docplayer.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2023.03.24]
, www.ptew.org.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2017.11.07]
, www.miejscapamiecinarodowej.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.04]

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MARTYROLOGY: BANSZEL Charles

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