• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

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  • SZCZEPANIUK Nicholas, source: www.russiacristiana.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZCZEPANIUK Nicholas
    source: www.russiacristiana.org
    own collection
  • SZCZEPANIUK Nicholas, source: newsaints.faithweb.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZCZEPANIUK Nicholas
    source: newsaints.faithweb.com
    own collection

religious status

Servant of God

surname

SZCZEPANIUK

forename(s)

Nicholas (pl. Mikołaj)

  • SZCZEPANIUK Nicholas - Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg, source: ipn.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSZCZEPANIUK Nicholas
    Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg
    source: ipn.gov.pl
    own collection

function

eparchial priest

creed

Ukrainian Greek Catholic GCmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

diocese / province

Lutsk‐Zhytomyr diocese (aeque principaliter)more on
www.catholic-hierarchy.org
[access: 2021.12.19]

Lviv GC archeparchymore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

date and place
of death

27.10.1937

ITL SevVostLagGuLAG slave labour camp network
today: Yagodnoye, Magadan oblast, Russia

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.09]

details of death

In 1914, as a result of the Russian offensive at the beginning of World War I, Lviv and most of Eastern Galicia (part of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, belonging to the Austro–Hungarian Monarchy) came under Russian occupation. When in 05.1915 the Russians were defeated in the Battle of Gorlice and began to retreat to the east prob. moved with Russian troops to Kiev.

There ministered not only in the Greek Catholic churches and parish, but also in local Roman Catholic churches and parishes of the Latin rite, some of them belonging to Lutsk–Zhytomyr diocese.

On the territory of eastern Ukraine under the Russian occupation also remained after the separatist Treaty of Brest–Litovsk of 03.1918 signed by Germany, Austria–Hungary and Bolshevik Russia, de facto ending the military operations of World War I on the Eastern Front, and after the Polish–Russian war of 1919‐1921 and the final Russian treaty of 18.03.1921, when his original Lviv archeparchy found itself in independent Poland.

Arrested by the Russians on 25.05.1929.

Accused of „setting the masses against Russian authorities, inciting against anti–religious propaganda and introducing religious fanaticism”.

On 23.11.1929 sentenced by a criminal Russian OGPU Council kangaroo court to 10 years of slave labour.

Transported to ITL TemLag concentration camp.

On 16.08.1933 released due to poor health.

Returned to Krymok where he ministered for a time.

On 25/27.07.1935 arrested again.

Accused of „membership of fascist counter–revolutionary organisation of Roman Catholic and Greek Catholic clergy”.

On 14.05.1936 in Kiev, in a group trial of 19 Catholics, sentenced to 5 years of slave labour.

On 17.07.1936 transported to ITL SevVostLag concentration camp.

Slaved in Yagodnoye village in Magadan in Russian Far East.

On 09.10.1937 arrested in the camp.

Next day sentenced to death by a genocidal Special Council NKVD kangaroo court (known as «NKVD Troika»).

Murdered in the camp.

cause of death

murder

perpetrators

Russians

date and place
of birth

08.03.1883

Cebrivtoday: Ozerna hrom., Ternopil rai., Ternopil, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.08.05]

alt. dates and places
of birth

08.09.1883

presbyter (holy orders)
ordination

1907

positions held

c. 1933 – c. 1935

priest — Vyshevychitoday: Vyshevychi hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish ⋄ Radomyshltoday: Radomyshl urban hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.20]
RC deanery

c. 1933 – c. 1935

priest — Borodiankatoday: Borodianka hrom., Bucha rai., Kiev, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ RC chapel ⋄ Kievtoday: Kiev city rai., Kiev city, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
RC deanery — sources give the name of the town (village) as „Boyarovka”, but no such place near Krymok could be identified; so the village of Borodianka where in 1932 Fr Leo Piotrowski ministered was assumed and adopted

c. 1933 – c. 1935

priest — Nemishaievetoday: Nemishaieve hrom., Bucha rai., Kiev, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.08.05]
⋄ RC chapel — sources give the name of the town (village) as „Nemenayevo”, but no such place near Krymok could be identified; so the village of Nemishaieve was assumed and adopted

c. 1933 – c. 1935

priest — Klavdiievotoday: Klavdiievo‐Tarasove, Nemishaieve hrom., Bucha rai., Kiev, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ RC chapel ⋄ Makarivtoday: Makariv hrom., Bucha rai., Kiev, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.27]
, Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish ⋄ Kievtoday: Kiev city rai., Kiev city, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
RC deanery

c. 1933 – c. 1935

priest — Radomyshltoday: Radomyshl urban hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.20]
⋄ RC church ⋄ Vyshevychitoday: Vyshevychi hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
, Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish ⋄ Radomyshltoday: Radomyshl urban hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.20]
RC deanery

c. 1933 – c. 1935

priest — Krymoktoday: Radomyshl urban hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
⋄ St Anthony of Padua RC chapel ⋄ Radomyshltoday: Radomyshl urban hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.20]
, RC church ⋄ Vyshevychitoday: Vyshevychi hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
, Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish ⋄ Radomyshltoday: Radomyshl urban hrom., Zhytomyr rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.08.20]
RC deanery

1917 – 1929

rector — Kievtoday: Kiev city rai., Kiev city, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
⋄ Sacred Heart of Jesus GC chapel ⋄ GC parish

till c. 1929

administrator — Makarivtoday: Makariv hrom., Bucha rai., Kiev, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.27]
⋄ Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish ⋄ Kievtoday: Kiev city rai., Kiev city, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
RC deanery

till c. 1929

administrator — Vynarivkatoday: Stavyshche hrom., Bila Tserkva rai., Kiev, Ukraine
more on
uk.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ St John the Evangelist RC parish ⋄ Kievtoday: Kiev city rai., Kiev city, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
RC deanery

administrator — Yanushpoltoday: Ivanopil, Krasnopil hrom., Berdychiv rai., Zhytomyr, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ RC church ⋄ GC parish ⋄ Vinnytsiatoday: Vinnytsia urban hrom., Vinnytsia rai., Vinnytsia, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
GC deanery

from 1915

librarian — Kievtoday: Kiev city rai., Kiev city, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.03.02]
⋄ GC parish — also: teacher of Ukrainian history

1907 – c. 1915

vicar — Lvivtoday: Lviv urban hrom., Lviv rai., Lviv, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
⋄ St George GC archcathedral parish ⋄ Lvivtoday: Lviv urban hrom., Lviv rai., Lviv, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
GC deanery — also: prefect of the cathedral sacristy (till c. 1911), prefect of the 3‐grade St Mary Magdalene school for Girls (c. 1909‐1914), 3‐grade Boris Grinchenko school (c. 1912‐1914), 4‐grade Zhovkovski School for Boys (c. 1910), 6‐grade Hryhoryi Piramovich School (c. 1909), member of the St Paul the Apostle Society (c. 1909‐1912)

till 1907

student — Innsbrucktoday: Innsbruck‐Land dist., Upper Austria state, Austria
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2024.03.19]

student — Lvivtoday: Lviv urban hrom., Lviv rai., Lviv, Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
⋄ Department of Theology, John Casimir University [i.e. clandestine John Casimir University (1941‐1944) / Ivan Franko University (1940‐1941) / John Casimir University (1919‐1939) / Franciscan University (1817‐1918)]

widower

others related
in death

BRAWERClick to display biography Stanislav, JACHNIEWICZClick to display biography Stanislav, KLEMCZYŃSKIClick to display biography Sigismund, WELIKClick to display biography Paul, BAUŽYSClick to display biography Zeno, RUDENKOClick to display biography Andronicus, PIOTROWSKIClick to display biography Leo, KECUNClick to display biography Joseph

murder sites
camp 
(+ prisoner no)

11.08.1937 Russian genocide: On 11.08.1937 Russian leader Stalin decided and NKVD head, Nicholas Jeżow, signed a «Polish operation» executive order no 00485. 139,835 Poles living in Russia were thus sentenced summarily to death. According to the records of the „Memorial” International Association for Historical, Educational, Charitable and Defense of Human Rights (Rus. Международное историко‐просветительское, правозащитное и благотворительное общество „Мемориал”), specialising with historical research and promoting knowledge about the victims of Russian repressions — 111,091 were murdered. 28,744 were sentenced to deportation to concentration camps in Gulag. Altogether however more than 100,000 Poles were deported, mainly to Kazakhstan, Siberia, Kharkov and Dniepropetrovsk. According to some historians, the number of victims should be multiplied by at least two, because not only the named persons were murdered, but entire Polish families (the mere suspicion of Polish nationality was sufficient). Taking into account the fact that the given number does not include the genocide in eastern Russia (Siberia), the number of victims may be as high as 500,000 Poles. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.03.14]
)

Great Purge 1937: „Great Terror” (also «Great Purge», also called „Yezhovshchyna” after the name of the then head of the NKVD) — a Russian state action of political terror, planned and directed against millions of innocent victims — national minorities, wealthier peasants (kulaks), people considered opponents political, army officers, the greatest intensity of which took place from 09.1936 to 08.1938. It reached its peak starting in the summer of 1937, when Art. 58‐14 of the Penal Code about „counter‐revolutionary sabotage” was passed , which became the basis for the „legalization” of murders, and on 02.07.1937 when the highest authorities of Russia, under the leadership of Joseph Stalin, issued a decree on the initiation of action against the kulaks. Next a number of executive orders of the NKVD followed, including No. 00439 of 25.07.1937, starting the liquidation of 25,000‐42,000 Germans living in Russia (mainly the so‐called Volga Germans); No. 00447 of 30.07.1937, beginning the liquidation of „anti‐Russian elements”, and No. 00485[2] of 11.08.1937, ordering the murder of 139,835 people of Polish nationality (the latter was the largest operation of this type — encompassed 12.5% of all those murdered during the «Great Purge», while Poles constituted 0.4% of the population). In the summer of 1937 Polish Catholic priests held in Solovetsky Islands, Anzer Island and ITL BelbaltLag were locked in prison cells (some in Sankt Petersburg). Next in a few kangaroo, murderous Russian trials (on 09.10.1937, 25.11.1937, among others) run by so‐called «NKVD Troika» all were sentenced to death. They were subsequently executed by a single shot to the back of the head. The murders took place either in Sankt Petersburg prison or directly in places of mass murder, e.g. Sandarmokh or Levashov Wilderness, where their bodies were dumped into the ditches. Other priests were arrested in the places they still ministered in and next murdered in local NKVD headquarters (e.g. in Minsk in Belarus), after equally genocidal trials run by aforementioned «NKVD Troika» kangaroo courts.

ITL SevVostLag: Russian Rus. Исправи́тельно‐Трудово́й Ла́герь (Eng. Corrective Labor Camp) ITL Rus. Северо‐Восточный (Eng. North‐East) — concentration and slave forced labor camp (within the Gulag complex), known also as „Kolyma” — initially headquartered in Ust‐Srednekan, and then in Magadan on the Bay of Nagayev in the Magadan Oblast. Founded on 01.04.1932. Prisoners slaved at searching, developing, mining and exploiting deposits of gold, tin, tungsten, cobalt, molybdenum, radioactive raw materials and coal in dozens of mines in the region, building and operating mineral processing and enrichment plants, building access roads and railway lines, building and maintaining a number of hydroelectric power plants, power plants and combined heat and power plants, power lines, construction of river ports, airports, cities, repair and mechanical workshops, factories of construction and supporting materials (cement, glass, rubber, production of refractory materials, bricks, sulfuric acid, steel), in fishing and agriculture, etc. At its peak — till the death on 05.03.1953 of Russian socialist leader, Joseph Stalin — c. 200,000 prisoners were held there: e.g. 70,414 (01.01.1937); 90,741 (01.01.1938); 138,170 (01.01.1939); 190,309 (01.07.1940); 179,041 (01.01.1941); 166,445 (01.07.1941); 147,976 (01.01.1942); 99,843 (01.01.1943); 76,388 (01.01.1944); 87,335 (01.01.1945); 69,389 (01.01.1946); 79,613 (01.01.1947); 106,893 (01.01.1948); 108,685 (01.01.1949); 131,773 (01.01.1950); 157,001 (01.01.1951); 170,557 (01.01.1952). The prisoners were transported on ships to Magadan port on the Sea of Okhotsk, an entry point to the camp, prior to be sent to target sub‐camps. Up to 6 mln of the perished. Ceased to exist not earlier than 20.09.1949 and not later than 20.05.1952. (more on: old.memo.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2024.04.08]
, www.gulagmuseum.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.05.30]
)

ITL TemLag: Russian Rus. Исправи́тельно‐Трудово́й Ла́герь (Eng. Corrective Labor Camp) ITL Rus. Темниковский (Eng. Temnykovskiy) — concentration and slave forced labor camp (within the Gulag complex) — headquartered initially in Temnykov and then in Yavas in Republic of Mordovia. Founded on 06.06.1931. Prisoners slaved at the forest felling and logging, production of consumer goods (including the production of clothing, e.g. uniforms for the Russian army, footwear), hemp and jute cultivation, production of armament materials (ammunition containers), construction of railway lines, e.g. Ryazan‐Potma, etc. At its peak c. 31,000 prisoners were held there: e.g. 22,166 (1932); 30,978 (1933); 28,329 (1934); 30,912 (01.01.1935); 20,974 (01.01.1936); 25,544 (01.01.1937); 22,821 (01.01.1939); 17,865 (01.01.1941); 15,803 (01.01.1947); 19,419 (01.01.1948). In 1943, out of 14,896 prisoners, there were 6,204 women. Ceased operations on 12.10.1948 and most of the prisoners were reclassified to the ITL DubrawLag concentration camp. (more on: old.memo.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2024.04.08]
)

Gulag: The acronym Gulag comes from the Rus. Главное управление исправительно‐трудовых лагерей и колоний (Eng. Main Board of Correctional Labor Camps). The network of Russian concentration camps for slave labor was formally established by the decision of the highest Russian authorities on 27.06.1929. Control was taken over by the OGPU, the predecessor of the genocidal NKVD (from 1934) and the MGB (from 1946). Individual gulags (camps) were often established in remote, sparsely populated areas, where industrial or transport facilities important for the Russian state were built. They were modeled on the first „great construction of communism”, the White Sea‐Baltic Canal (1931‐1932), and Naftali Frenkel, of Jewish origin, is considered the creator of the system of using forced slave labor within the Gulag. He went down in history as the author of the principle „We have to squeeze everything out of the prisoner in the first three months — then nothing is there for us”. He was to be the creator, according to Alexander Solzhenitsyn, of the so‐called „Boiler system”, i.e. the dependence of food rations on working out a certain percentage of the norm. The term ZEK — prisoner — i.e. Rus. заключенный‐каналоармец (Eng. canal soldier) — was coined in the ITL BelBaltLag managed by him, and was adopted to mean a prisoner in Russian slave labor camps. Up to 12 mln prisoners were held in Gulag camps at one time, i.e. c. 5% of Russia's population. In his book „The Gulag Archipelago”, Solzhenitsyn estimated that c. 60 mln people were killed in the Gulag until 1956. Formally dissolved on 20.01.1960. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2024.04.08]
)

Trial of 14.05.1936: Trial of 19 Catholics, including four women and eight Catholic priests: Fr Stanislav Brawer, Fr. Stanislav Jachniewicz, Fr Roman Jankowski, Fr Sigismund Klemczyński, Fr Joseph Koziński, Fr Alois Schönfeld, Fr Peter Welik and Greek‐Catholic Fr Nicholas Szczepaniuk, the last Catholic pastors ministering in Zhytomyr vicinity, held in Kiev. They were accused of „counter‐revolutionary activities”, „remaining in touch with counter‐revolutionary representative of foreign centers”, „usage of Polish national banners during religious festivities” and „membership of fascist counter‐revolutionary roman‐catholic and greek‐catholic priests’ organization in the Western Ukraine”. The genocidal Russian summary court, so‐called «NKVD Troika», sent most for many years to Russian concentration camps Gulag. (more on: history.org.uaClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.02.02]
)

Kiev (Lyukyanivska): Russian political prison in Kiev, in the first half of 20th century run by the genocidal NKVD, informally referred to as prison No 1, formally as Investigative Prison No 13 (SIZO#13). It was founded in the early 19th century. In the 20th century, during the Soviet times, the prison church was transformed into another block of cells. During the reign of J. Stalin in Russia, more than 25,000 prisoners passed through it. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.09.21]
)

Zhytomyr (prison): Russian investigative prison known for cruel interrogation methods used by the Russians. Execution site as well.

Polish‐Russian war of 1919‐1921: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik‐like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
)

sources

personal:
biographies.library.nd.eduClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
, www.rsvetal.narod.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.10.13]
, ru.openlist.wikiClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.10.13]
, history.org.uaClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.02.02]

bibliographical:
Fate of the Catholic clergy in USSR 1917‐1939. Martyrology”, Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, ed. Science Society KUL, 2003, Lublin
original images:
www.russiacristiana.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
, newsaints.faithweb.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.03.21]
, ipn.gov.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.02.02]

LETTER to CUSTODIAN/ADMINISTRATOR

If you have an Email client on your communicator/computer — such as Mozilla Thunderbird, Windows Mail or Microsoft Outlook, described at WikipediaPatrz:
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MARTYROLOGY: SZCZEPANIUK Nicholas

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