• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

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  • GRABOWSKI Sigismund; source: thanks to Ms John Henry Karkocha's kindness (private correspondence, 07.09.2020), own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOGRABOWSKI Sigismund
    source: thanks to Ms John Henry Karkocha's kindness (private correspondence, 07.09.2020)
    own collection

surname

GRABOWSKI

forename(s)

Sigismund (pl. Zygmunt)

  • GRABOWSKI Sigismund - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOGRABOWSKI Sigismund
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection
  • GRABOWSKI Sigismund - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOGRABOWSKI Sigismund
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Churchmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Lutsk diocesemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

Zhytomyr diocesemore on
www.catholic-hierarchy.org
[access: 2021.12.19]

Military Ordinariate of Polandmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.12.20]

date and place of death

10.08.1942

TA HartheimSchloss Hartheim „euthanasia” center
today: Alkoven, Eferding dist., Salzburg, Austria

alt. dates and places of death

12.09.1942 (KL Dachau „death certificate” date)

details of death

On 28.04.1939 nominated chaplain of the Polish Army reserve.

In 08.1939 mobilized into Polish Army.

During German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939, after start of the II World War, chaplain of the 12th Podole Cavalry Regiment of Volyn Cavalry Brigade.

After September 1939 defeat avoided arrest.

Unable to return to his diocese taken over by the Russians returned to his homeland and ministered as a vicar in Jędrzejów, in County hospital among others.

There participated in emerging Polish resistance Armed Struggle Union ZWZ (part of Polish Clandestine State) and there also arrested by the Germans on 11.06.1940.

Jailed in Kielce prison.

Next on 15.07.1940 taken to KL Sachsenhausen concentration camp and from there on 14.12.1940 to KL Dachau concentration camp.

Finally totally exhausted brought in a so‑called „invalid transport” to TA Hartheim Euthanasia Center and murdered in a gas chamber.

cause of death

extermination: gassing in a gas chamber

perpetrators

Germans

date and place of birth

25.08.1897

Jędrzejówtoday: Jędrzejów gm., Jędrzejów pow., Holy Cross voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.06.07

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

10.06.1923 (Lutsktoday: Lutsk rai., Volyn obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17
)

positions held

1939 – 1940

chaplain {Jędrzejówtoday: Jędrzejów Stary and Jędrzejów Nowy, Jakubów gm., Mińsk Mazowiecki pow., Masovia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.28
, District Hospital}

1936 – 1939

parish priest {parish: Shumbartoday: Kremenets rai., Ternopil obl., Ukraine, Sacred Heart of Jesus; dean.: Kremenetstoday: Kremenets rai., Ternopil obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.10.18
}

parish priest {parish: Wojtkiewicze; dean.: Sarnytoday: Rivne obl., Ukraine}

parish priest {parish: Chołoniewicze; dean.: Rivnetoday: Rivne rai., Rivne obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17
}

from 1930

chaplain {5th Brigade, Border Security Corps KOP}

1927 – 1930

parish priest {parish: Rafałówka; dean.: Sarnytoday: Rivne obl., Ukraine}

1927 – 1930

administrator {parish: Czartorysk; dean.: Sarnytoday: Rivne obl., Ukraine}

1925 – 1927

steward/custodian {Lutsktoday: Lutsk rai., Volyn obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17
, Theological Seminary}

1925 – 1927

notary {Lutsktoday: Lutsk rai., Volyn obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17
, Office, Diocesan Curia; dioc.: Lutsk}

1923 – 1925

prefect {parish: Koveltoday: Kovel rai., Volyn obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.19
, St Anne; Julius Słowacki's State Gymnasium; dean.: Koveltoday: Kovel rai., Volyn obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.19
}

1919 – 1923

student {Olykatoday: Kivertsi rai., Volyn obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17
, philosophy and theology, Theological Seminary}, Lutsk–Żytomierz diocese

till 1919

student {Kielcetoday: Kielce city pow., Holy Cross voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.06.07
, philosophy and theology, Theological Seminary}

others related in death

ABTClick to display biography Steven, AKSMANClick to display biography Julius Felician, ANDRZEJEWSKIClick to display biography Casimir, BĄKClick to display biography John Baptist, BIELOWSKIClick to display biography Joseph, CEPIELClick to display biography Charles, CHABERKOWSKIClick to display biography Steven, CHYCZEWSKIClick to display biography Joseph, CISZAKClick to display biography Boleslaus, CZAPCZYKClick to display biography Henry, DEMBOWSKIClick to display biography Casimir Marian Anthony, DETKENSClick to display biography Edward, DRAPIEWSKIClick to display biography Theodore, DRZEWIECKIClick to display biography Francis, DYJAClick to display biography Edward, DZIENISZClick to display biography Leo, FALKOWSKIClick to display biography Theophilus, GABRYELSKIClick to display biography Thaddeus Narcissus, GRZESITOWSKIClick to display biography Stanislaus, GRZYMAŁAClick to display biography Edward, GUTOWSKIClick to display biography Leo, GZELClick to display biography Eugene Henry, HERMAŃCZYKClick to display biography Oscar, JARANOWSKIClick to display biography Boleslaus Ignatius, KAZIMIEROWICZClick to display biography Henry Maximilian, KLINClick to display biography Conrad Anastasius, KONSTANTYNOWICZClick to display biography Stanislaus Peter, KORCZAKClick to display biography Valentine, KOSTRZEWAClick to display biography Nicholas, KOTELAClick to display biography Joseph, KOWALSKIClick to display biography Sigismund Marian, KOZIKClick to display biography Valentine (Fr Cherubin), KRĘCICKIClick to display biography Boleslaus, KRZAKClick to display biography William, KURKOWSKIClick to display biography Leo Paul, LASKOWSKIClick to display biography Henry, MACIEJEWSKIClick to display biography Leo, MAKOWSKIClick to display biography Alexander Ceslaus, MĄDRYClick to display biography John, MICHNIEWSKIClick to display biography Stanislaus Thomas, MOLSKIClick to display biography Joseph

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

TA Hartheim: In Germ. Tötungsanstalt TA Hartheim (Eng. Killing/Euthanasia Center), in Schloss Hartheim castle in Alkoven village in Upper Austria, belonging to KL Mauthausen–Gusen complex of concentration camps, as part of „Aktion T4”, the victims — underdeveloped mentally — were murdered by Germans in gas chambers. In 04.1941 Germans expanded the program to include prisoners held in concentration camps. Most if not all religious from KL Dachau were taken to Hartheim in so called „transports of invalids” (denoted as „Aktion 14 f 13”) — prisoners sick and according to German standards „unable to work” — from KL Dachau concentration camp (initially under the guise of a transfer to a „better” camp).
Note: The dates of death of victims murdered in Schloss Hartheim indicated in the „White Book” are the dates of deportations from the last concentration camp the victims where held in. The real dates of death are unknown — apart from c. 49 priests whose names were included in the „transports of invalids”, but who did arrive at TA Hartheim. Prob. perished on the day of transport, somewhere between KL Dachau and Munich, and their bodies were thrown out of the transport and cremated in Munich. The investigation conducted by Polish Institute of National Remembrance IPN concluded, that the other victims were murdered immediately upon arrival in Schloss Hartheim, bodies cremated and the ashes spread over local fields and into Danube river. In order to hide details of the genocided Germans falsified both dates of death (for instance those entered into KL Dachau concentration camp books, presented in „White Book” as alternative dates of death) and their causes. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2019.05.30)

Aktion T4: German euthanasia program, systematic murder of people mentally retarded, chronically, mentally and neurologically ill — „elimination of live not worth living” (Germ. „Vernichtung von lebensunwertem Leben”). In a peak, in 1940‑1, c. 70,000 people were murdered, including patients of psychiatric hospitals in German occupied Poland. From 04.1941 also mentally ill and „disabled” (i.e. unable to work) prisoners held in German concentration camps were included in the program — denoted then as „Aktion 14 f 13”. C. 20,000 inmates were then murdered, including Polish catholic priests held in KL Dachau concentration camp, who were murdered in Hartheim gas chambers. The other „regional extension” of Aktion T4 was „Aktion Brandt” program during which Germans murdered chronically ill patients in order to make space for wounded soldiers. It is estimated that at least 30,000 were murdered in this program. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2014.10.31)

KL Dachau (prisoner no: 22630Click to display biography): KL Dachau in German Bavaria, set up in 1933, became the main concentration camp for Catholic priests and religious during II World War: Germans imprisoned there approx. 3,000 priests, including 1,800 Poles. They were forced to slave at so‑called „Plantags”, doing manual field works, at constructions, including crematorium. In the barracks ruled hunger, freezing cold in the winter and suffocating heat during the summer. Prisoners suffered from bouts of illnesses, including tuberculosis. Many were victims of murderous „medical experiments” — in 11.1942 c. 20 were given phlegmon injections; in 07.1942 to 05.1944 c. 120 were used by for malaria experiments. More than 750 Polish clerics where murdered by the Germans, some brought to Schloss Hartheim euthanasia centre and murdered in gas chambers. At its peak KL Dachau concentration camps’ system had nearly 100 slave labour sub–camps located throughout southern Germany and Austria. There were c. 32,000 documented deaths at the camp, and thousands perished without a trace. C. 10,000 of the 30,000 inmates were found sick at the time of liberation, on 29.04.1945, by the USA troops… (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2016.05.30)

KL Sachsenhausen: In KL Sachsenhausen concentration camp, set up in the former Olympic village in 07.1936, hundreds of Polish priests were held in 1940, before being transported to KL Dachau. Some of them perished in KL Sachsenhausen. Murderous medical experiments on prisoners were carried out in the camp. In 1942‑4 c. 140 prisoners slaved at manufacturing false British pounds, passports, visas, stamps and other documents. Other prisoners also had to do slave work, for Heinkel aircraft manufacturer, AEG and Siemens among others. On average c. 50,000 prisoners were held at any time. Altogether more than 200,000 inmates were in jailed in KL Sachsenhausen and its branched, out of which tens of thousands perished. Prior to Russian arrival mass evacuation was ordered by the Germans and c. 80,000 prisoners were marched west in so‑called „death marches” to other camps, i.e. KL Mauthausen–Gusen and KL Bergen–Belsen. The camp got liberated on 22.04.1945. After end of armed hostilities Germans set up there secret camp for German prisoners and „suspicious” Russian soldiers. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2018.11.18)

Kielce: The prison at Zamkowa Str. in Kielce was opened in 1826‑8. In 09.1939, after start of German occupation, under German control. Initially a POW camp and next prison run by German political police Gestapo. Till 1945 more then c. 16,000 prisoners were held there. Any time c. 2,000 were incarcerated, in space build for c. 400 people. Prisoners, in extremely cramped conditions, were starved, ill–treated and murdered in prison, executed outside, transported to German concentration camps or deported to slave labour sites. Prison chapel Germans used as torture chamber. At the same time in 08.1941 (after German attack on 22.06.1941 of their erstwhile ally, Russians, do till the autumn of 1944 in Fijałkowski’s barracks in Kielce Bukówka district Germans set up a POW camp for Russian prisoners (branch of Stalag XII C „Kamienna” in Skarżysko–Kamienna, later of Stalag 367 Częstochowa). According to one of the witnesses first 100 POWs were brought in 09.1941. A week later 4,500 more arrived and within a fortnight another 5,000. Following that the POWs were brought in groups of 500‑1,000. Altogether c. 15,000‑20,000 Russian POWs were held in the camp. POWs slaved at forest clearances, digging sewage ditches, at train loading. They got a hunger rations (as a result acts of cannibalism took place). Slept in unheated barracks. Were beaten and tortured (with wooden battons). Received to medical help. For any type of transgression they were penalized with execution. The camp was managed by the Germans and was supported by a camp’s militia, composed mainly by the Ukrainians. Only few hundred prisoners survived who in the autumn of 1944 were transferred to other camps. From 1945 in Russian Commie–Nazi hands. Till 1956 many political prisoners, e.g. members of former restistance Home Army AK and National Armed Forces NSZ (part of Polish Clandestine State) where held camptive there. On 04‑05.1945 Polish partisans commanded by Mjr Anthony Heda attacked the prison and release c. 700 prisoners. (more on: www.chroniclesofterror.plClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2020.02.08)

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so–called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro–Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2015.09.30)

sources

personal:
www.hdbg.deClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2012.11.23, www.duszki.plClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2012.11.23, www.andreovia.plClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2017.03.11, arolsen-archives.orgClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2019.05.30
bibliograhical:, „Martyrology of the Polish Roman Catholic clergy under nazi occupation in 1939‑1945”, Victor Jacewicz, John Woś, vol. I‑V, Warsaw Theological Academy, 1977‑1981, „Register of Latin rite Lviv metropolis clergy’s losses in 1939‑45”, Józef Krętosz, Maria Pawłowiczowa, editors, Opole, 2005, „Biographical lexicon of Lviv Roman Catholic Metropoly clergy victims of the II World War 1939‑1945”, Mary Pawłowiczowa (ed.), Fr Joseph Krętosz (ed.), Holy Cross Publishing, Opole, 2007,
original images:
www.katedrapolowa.plClick to attempt to display webpageaccess: 2014.01.16

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MARTYROLOGY: GRABOWSKI Sigismund

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