• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

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  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary), source: www.franciszkanie.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    source: www.franciszkanie.pl
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary), source: skarbykosciola.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    source: skarbykosciola.pl
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary), source: mkolbe.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    source: mkolbe.pl
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary), source: zyciorysy.info, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    source: zyciorysy.info
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary), source: louisgrignion.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    source: louisgrignion.pl
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary), source: samequizy.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    source: samequizy.pl
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary) - 1940, source: commons.wikimedia.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    1940
    source: commons.wikimedia.org
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary) - Contemporary image; source: Lukas Janecki, „Biographical-bibliographical dictionary of Polish Conventual Franciscan Fathers murdered and tragically dead in 1939—45”, Franciscan Fathers’ Publishing House, Niepokalanów, 2016, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    Contemporary image
    source: Lukas Janecki, „Biographical-bibliographical dictionary of Polish Conventual Franciscan Fathers murdered and tragically dead in 1939—45”, Franciscan Fathers’ Publishing House, Niepokalanów, 2016
    own collection

religious status

saint

surname

KOLBE

forename(s)

Raymond (pl. Rajmund)

religious forename(s)

Maximilian Mary (pl. Maksymilian Maria)

  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary) - Monument, St Matthew church, Pabianice, source: pl.wikipedia.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    Monument, St Matthew church, Pabianice
    source: pl.wikipedia.org
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary) - Commemorative plaque, St Francis Stygmata church, Warsaw-New Town, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    Commemorative plaque, St Francis Stygmata church, Warsaw-New Town
    source: own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary) - Commemorative plaque, St Francis Stygmata church, Warsaw-New Town, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    Commemorative plaque, St Francis Stygmata church, Warsaw-New Town
    source: own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary) - Commemorative plaque, Franciscans' church, Cracow, 5 Franciszkańska str., source: www.sowiniec.com.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    Commemorative plaque, Franciscans' church, Cracow, 5 Franciszkańska str.
    source: www.sowiniec.com.pl
    own collection
  • KOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary) - Commemorative plaque, Our Lady the Immaculate church, Harmęże, source: www.harmeze.franciszkanie.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKOLBE Raymond (Fr Maximilian Mary)
    Commemorative plaque, Our Lady the Immaculate church, Harmęże
    source: www.harmeze.franciszkanie.pl
    own collection

beatification date

17.10.1971

Paul VImore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

canonisation date

10.10.1982

John Paul IImore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

function

religious cleric

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Churchmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

congregation

Order of Friars Minor Conventual (Conventual Franciscans - OFMConv)more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

diocese / province

Immaculate Mary province OFMConvmore on
pl.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.08.18]

academic distinctions

Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Theology

date and place of death

14.08.1941

KL Auschwitzconcentration camp
today: Oświęcim, Oświęcim gm., Oświęcim pow., Lesser Poland voiv., Poland

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.09]

details of death

After German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the II World War, after start of German occupation, arrested by the Germans on 19.09.1939 in Niepokalanów.

Interned in POW camps (in Lamsdorf, Amtitz — from 22.09.1939 and Schildberg — from 09.11.1939).

Released on 08.12.1939.

Next on 17.02.1941 arrested again by the Germans for hiding of more than 1,500 Jews in Niepokalanów monastery buildings (among others).

Jailed in Pawiak prison in Warsaw.

On 04.04.1941 transported to KL Auschwitz concentration camp where perished: volunteered to replace a person sentenced to death in a so‑called „starvation bunker” and was finally murdered with a phenol injection.

cause of death

murder

perpetrators

Germans

date and place of birth

08.01.1894

Zduńska Wolatoday: Zduńska Wola urban gm., Zduńska Wola pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]

religious vows

05.09.1911 (temporary)
01.11.1914 (permanent)

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

28.04.1918 (Sant'Andrea della Valle church in Rome)

positions held

1936 – 1941

guardian {Niepokalanówtoday: part of Paprotnia village, Teresin gm., Sochaczew pow., Masovia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.10.09]
, Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}, also: director of the printing house, publisher of „Knight of the Immaculate”, „Little Daily”, „Little Knight of the Immaculate”, „Small Knight of the Immaculate” (from 1938), „Missionary Bulletin” (from 1939),director of short–wave broadcasting station, member of the Board of Polish Union of Dailies and Magazines' Editors (from 1937)

1930 – 1936

guardian {Nagasakitoday: Nagasaki pref., Kiusiu reg., Japan
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.10.26]
, Conventual Franciscans Order}, missionary, founder of the monastery „Mugenzai no Sono” (Eng. „Garden of the Immaculate”) and the Minor Seminary (1936), publisher of the Japanese version of the „Knight of the Immaculate”

1927 – 1930

guardian {Niepokalanówtoday: part of Paprotnia village, Teresin gm., Sochaczew pow., Masovia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.10.09]
, Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}, founder of the monastery, publisher and editor of the „Knight of the Immaculate” monthly

1924 – 1927

friar {Grodnotoday: Grodno dist., Grodno reg., Belarus, Our Lady of the Angels monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}, publisher and editor of the „Knight of the Immaculate” monthly, founder of the printing house

1922 – 1924

friar {Krakówtoday: Kraków city pow., Lesser Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.06.07]
, St Francis of Assisi monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}, founder, publisher and editor of the „Knight of the Immaculate” monthly

1921

friar {Nieszawatoday: Nieszawa gm., Aleksandrów Kujawski pow., Kuyavia–Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.11.05]
, Finding the Holy Cross monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}, convalescent

1920 – 1921

chaplain {Zakopanetoday: Zakopane urban gm., Tatra pow., Lesser Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, Climate Hospital}, tuberculosis treatment; also: chaplain of the academic Health Center „Brotherly Support”

1920

friar {Lvivtoday: Lviv city rai., Lviv obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
, Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}, head of the novitiate

1919 – 1920

professor {Krakówtoday: Kraków city pow., Lesser Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.06.07]
, Philosophical and Theological Studies, St Francis of Assisi monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}, lecturer in Church history

1915 – 1919

PhD student {Rometoday: Rome prov., Lazio reg., Italy
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, Department of Theology, St Bonaventure International College „Seraphicum”, Conventual Franciscans Order}, public defense PhD thesis on 22.07.1919

16.10.1917

co–founder {Rometoday: Rome prov., Lazio reg., Italy
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, „Militia of the Immaculata” Association (Lat. „Militia Immaculatae”) today: „Knights of the Immaculata”}

1912 – 1915

PhD student {Rometoday: Rome prov., Lazio reg., Italy
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, philosophy, Pontifical Gregorian University (Lat. Pontificia Universitas Gregoriana) – „Gregorianum”}, public defense PhD thesis in 1915

1912 – 1915

student {Rometoday: Rome prov., Lazio reg., Italy
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, philosophy and theology, St Bonaventure International College „Seraphicum”, Conventual Franciscans Order}

1912

student {Krakówtoday: Kraków city pow., Lesser Poland voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.06.07]
, Philosophical and Theological Studies, St Francis of Assisi monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}

1911 – 1912

friar {Lvivtoday: Lviv city rai., Lviv obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
, Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}, student of the last 8th grade of the Minor Theological Seminary (gymnasium), culminating with matura exam

04.09.1910 – 05.09.1911

novitiate {Lvivtoday: Lviv city rai., Lviv obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
, Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}

1908 – 1910

pupil {Lvivtoday: Lviv city rai., Lviv obl., Ukraine
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.16]
, Minor Theological Seminary (gymnasium) at the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary monastery, Conventual Franciscans Order}

others related in death

BAJEWSKIClick to display biography John Eugene (Fr Antoninus), BARTOSIKClick to display biography Louis (Fr Pius Mary), TROJANOWSKIClick to display biography Stanislaus Anthony (Bro. Timothy), ŻUKOWSKIClick to display biography Peter (Bro. Boniface)

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

KL Auschwitz (prisoner no: 16670Click to display biography): German KL Auschwitz concentration camp (Germ. Konzentrationslager) and death camp (Germ. Vernichtungslager) camp was set up by Germans around 27.01.1940 n. Oświęcim, on the German territory (initially in Germ. Provinz Schlesien — Silesia Province; and from 1941 Germ. Provinz Oberschlesien — Upper Silesia Province). Initially mainly Poles were interned. From 1942 it became the centre for holocaust of European Jews. Part of the KL Auschwitz concentration camps’ complex was death camp (Germ. Vernichtungslager) KL Auschwitz II Birkenau, located not far away from the main camp. There Germans murder possibly in excess of million people, mainly Jews, in gas chambers. Altogether In excess of 400 priests and religious went through the KL Auschwitz, approx. 40% of which were murdered (mainly Poles). (more on: www.meczennicy.pelplin.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.07.06]
)

Pawiak: Investigative prison in Warsaw, built by the Russian occupiers of Poland in 1830‑5. During the Poland partition's period, a Russian investigative prison, both criminal and political. During World War II and the German occupation, the largest German prison in the General Government. Initially, it was subordinate to the Justice Department of the General Governorate, and from 03.1940 Germ. Sicherheitspolizei und des Sicherheitsdienst (Eng. Security Police and Security Service) of the Warsaw District — in particular the German Secret Political Police Gestapo. c. 3,000 prisoners were kept in Pawiak permanently, of which about 2,200 in the men's unit and c. 800 in the women's unit (the so‑called Serbia) — with a „capacity” of c. 1,000 prisoners. In total, in the years 1939–1944, c. 100,000 Poles passed through the prison, of which c. 37,000 were murdered in executions — from 10.1943 Pawiak prisoners were murdered in open executions on the streets of Warsaw (sometimes several times a day) — during interrogations, in cells or in a prison „hospital”, and c. 60,000 were taken in 95 transports to concentration camps (mainly KL Auischwitz), other places of isolation or to forced labor. The prison Germans demolished during the Warsaw Uprising in 08‑10.1944. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2022.08.17]
)

Stalag XXI A Schildberg: Stalag XXI A Schildberg — German POW camp complex located in Schildberg (today: Ostrzeszów). Almost all inhabitants of the town were evicted to make space for the camp. During initial period 1939‑40 civilians (c. 12,000) were also held there — apart from Polish POWs — brought from all over Poland, including Franciscan Fathers from Niepokalanów (11.11.1939‑08.12.1939). Later British and Norwegian POWs, among others, were held captive. In practice operated also as a Germ. Durchgangslager (Eng. transit camp). In 1939‑45 c. 125,000 Polish and Allied POWs were held there. In peak up to 30,000 were incarcerated. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.11.17]
)

Stalag III B Fürstenberg/Oder – Amtitz branch: Stalag III B Fürstenberg/Oder — German POW camp. Founded in Fürstenberg/Oder (today part of Eisenhüttenstadt). POWs slaved at weapons and chemicals manufacture, among others. In 1938 in Amtitz (today Gębice) the camp’s branch, functioning in 1938‑43, was constructed. Initially a few dozen Czechs were held there. After German attack of Poland in 09.1939 Poles were brought in, including c. 100 priests and friars (among them bl. Maximilian Kolbe). Altogether c. 20,000‑25,000 prisoners were held captive. From 1940 a transit camp for people sent subsequently for slave labour deep into Germany. (more on: pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.11.06]
)

Stalag VIII B Lamsdorf: Stalag VIII B Lamsdorf (from 1943 Stalag 344 Lamsdorf) — German POW camp in Łambinowice, mainly for privates and NCOs. In 1930‑40 in excess of 40,000 Poles where kept there. Altogether c. 100,000 prisoners from Australia, Belgium, British India, British Palestine, Canada, France, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, South Africa, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man, the United States and Yugoslavia passed through this camp. In 1941 a separate camp, Stalag VIII–F was set up close by to house the Soviet prisoners. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.11.17]
)

Help to the Jews: During II World War on the Polish occupied territories Germans forbid to give any support to the Jews under penalty of death. Hundreds of Polish priests and religious helped the Jews despite this official sanction. Many of them were caught and murdered. (more on: www.naszdziennik.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.31]
)

General Governorate: A separate administrative territorial region set up by the Germans in 1939 after defeat of Poland, which included German‑occupied part of Polish territory that was not directly incorporate into German state. Created as the result of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, in a political sense, was to recreate the German idea of 1915 (after the defeat of the Russians in the Battle of Gorlice in 05.1915 during World War I) of establishing a Polish enclave within Germany (also called the General Governorate at that time). It was run by the Germans till 1945 and final Russian offensive, and was a part of so–called Big Germany — Grossdeutschland. Till 31.07.1940 formally known as Germ. Generalgouvernement für die besetzten polnischen Gebiete (Eng. General Governorate for occupied Polish territories) — later as simply niem. Generalgouvernement (Eng. General Governorate). From 07.1941 expanded to include district Galicia. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.12.04]
)

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so–called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro–Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

sources

personal:
www.bj.uj.edu.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]
,
original images:
www.franciszkanie.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.04.16]
, skarbykosciola.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.04.16]
, mkolbe.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.04.16]
, zyciorysy.infoClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.04.16]
, louisgrignion.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.04.16]
, samequizy.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.04.16]
, commons.wikimedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.12.19]
, pl.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.01.16]
, www.sowiniec.com.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.07.11]
, www.harmeze.franciszkanie.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.03.21]

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If you have an Email client on your communicator/computer — such as Mozilla Thunderbird, Windows Mail or Microsoft Outlook, described at WikipediaPatrz:
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MARTYROLOGY: KOLBE Raymond

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