• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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full list:

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WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

po polskuKliknij by wyświetlić to bio po polsku

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJAKliknij by wyświetlić to bio po polsku
  • KLARZAK Joseph - 06.1939, Kamienica Polska, source: www.facebook.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKLARZAK Joseph
    06.1939, Kamienica Polska
    source: www.facebook.com
    own collection
  • KLARZAK Joseph - 03.1940, oflag IX A/Z Rotenburg a. d. Fulda, source: doi.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKLARZAK Joseph
    03.1940, oflag IX A/Z Rotenburg a. d. Fulda
    source: doi.org
    own collection
  • KLARZAK Joseph - 03.1940, oflag IX A/Z Rotenburg a. d. Fulda (J. Klarzak fifth from the left in the second row from the bottom), source: hinterstacheldraht.jimdo.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKLARZAK Joseph
    03.1940, oflag IX A/Z Rotenburg a. d. Fulda (J. Klarzak fifth from the left in the second row from the bottom)
    source: hinterstacheldraht.jimdo.com
    own collection

surname

KLARZAK

surname
versions/aliases

KLARCZAK

forename(s)

Joseph (pl. Józef)

  • KLARZAK Joseph - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKLARZAK Joseph
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection
  • KLARZAK Joseph - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKLARZAK Joseph
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Churchmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Częstochowa diocesemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.05.19]

Włocławek ie. Kalisz diocese
Military Ordinariate of Polandmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.12.20]

date and place of death

19.08.1942

KL Dachauconcentration camp
today: Dachau, Upper Bavaria reg., Bavaria state, Germany

more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2016.05.30]

details of death

chaplain of the Polish Army reserve.

After German invasion on 01.09.1939 (Russians invaded Poland 17 days later) and start of the World War II Germans on 02.09.1939 conducted search of his rectory and found Polish military uniform, Scouts Union uniform and military mobilisation order.

Arrested on spot.

Jailed in Blachownia and Dobrodzień camps and next brought to Stalag VIII B Lamsdorf POW camp.

From there moved to Oflag IX A/Z Rotenburg POW camp.

Next in contravention of Geneva conventions of 27.07.1929 transported as POW to KL Buchenwald concentration camp.

Finally on 06‑07.07.1942 moved to KL Dachau concentration camp where perished.

cause of death

extermination: exhaustion and starvation

perpetrators

Germans

date and place of birth

20.02.1887

Aleksandrówtoday: Strzelce gm., Kutno pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.10.09]

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

25.03.1915

positions held

1937 – 1939

parish priest {parish: Kamienica Polskatoday: Kamienica Polska gm., Częstochowa pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.11]
, St Michael the Archangel; dean.: Częstochowatoday: Częstochowa city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
}

1926 – 1937

parish priest {parish: Ożarówtoday: Mokrsko gm., Wieluń pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.11]
, St Mary Magdalene; dean.: Praszkatoday: Praszka gm., Olesno pow., Opole voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.11]
}

1926

administrator {parish: Mierzycetoday: Wierzchlas. gm., Wieluń pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.11]
, St Catherine the Virgin and Martyr; dean.: Wieluńtoday: Wieluń gm., Wieluń pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
}

1924 – 1926

vicar {parish: Mierzycetoday: Wierzchlas. gm., Wieluń pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.11]
, St Catherine the Virgin and Martyr; dean.: Wieluńtoday: Wieluń gm., Wieluń pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
}

1921 – 1924

vicar {parish: Częstochowatoday: Częstochowa city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, Holy Family; dean.: Częstochowatoday: Częstochowa city pow., Silesia voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
}

1915 – 1921

vicar {parish: Lututówtoday: Lututów gm., Wieruszów pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.12.11]
, Holy Trinity and St Matthew the Apostle; dean.: Wieluńtoday: Wieluń gm., Wieluń pow., Łódź voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.07.18]
}

1909 – 1915

student {Włocławektoday: Włocławek city pow., Kuyavia–Pomerania voiv., Poland
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.12.18]
, philosophy and theology, Theological Seminary}

chaplain {scoutmaster, Polish Scouting Association ZHP}

others related in death

BELONClick to display biography Zdislaus Anthony, BRYDACKIClick to display biography Louis, DACHTERAClick to display biography Francis, DRWALClick to display biography Francis, FRANCUZClick to display biography John, GÓRALIKClick to display biography John, JĘDRYSIKClick to display biography Severin (Fr Vincent), KRYŃSKIClick to display biography Adolph, LISSOWSKIClick to display biography Ceslaus Joseph, MICHUŁKAClick to display biography John, MIEGOŃClick to display biography Vladislav, STOPCZAKClick to display biography Marian, SYPERClick to display biography Stanislaus, SZABELSKIClick to display biography Edward, ŚWIDEREKClick to display biography Vladislav, TOMIAKClick to display biography Joseph, TRUSSClick to display biography Boleslaus Cyriac, ZAKRZEWSKIClick to display biography John, ZIEMIAŃSKIClick to display biography Michael Urban, ZIĘBAClick to display biography Adalbert

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

KL Dachau (prisoner no: 31214Click to display biography): KL Dachau in German Bavaria, set up in 1933, became the main concentration camp for Catholic priests and religious during II World War: On c. 09.11.1940, Reichsführer–SS Heinrich Himmler, head of the SS, Gestapo and German police, as a result of the Vatican's intervention, decided to transfer all clergymen detained in various concentration camps to KL Dachau camp. The first major transports took place on 08.12.1940. In KL Dachau Germans held approx. 3,000 priests, including 1,800 Poles. They were forced to slave at so‑called „Plantags”, doing manual field works, at constructions, including crematorium. In the barracks ruled hunger, freezing cold in the winter and suffocating heat during the summer. Prisoners suffered from bouts of illnesses, including tuberculosis. Many were victims of murderous „medical experiments” — in 11.1942 c. 20 were given phlegmon injections; in 07.1942 to 05.1944 c. 120 were used by for malaria experiments. More than 750 Polish clerics where murdered by the Germans, some brought to Schloss Hartheim euthanasia centre and murdered in gas chambers. At its peak KL Dachau concentration camps’ system had nearly 100 slave labour sub–camps located throughout southern Germany and Austria. There were c. 32,000 documented deaths at the camp, and thousands perished without a trace. C. 10,000 of the 30,000 inmates were found sick at the time of liberation, on 29.04.1945, by the USA troops… (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.05.30]
)

KL Buchenwald (prisoner no: 2995Click to display biography): In KL Buchenwald concentration camp, founded in 1937 and operational till 1945, Germans held c. 238,380 prisoners and murdered approx. 56,000 of them, among them thousands of Poles. Prisoners were victims of pseudo–scientific experiments, conducted among others by Behring–Werke from Marburg and Robert Koch Institute from Berlin companies. They slaved for Gustloff in Weimar and Fritz–Sauckel companies manufacturing armaments. To support Erla–Maschinenwerk GmbH in Leipzig, Junkers in Schönebeck (airplanes) and Rautal in Wernigerode Germans organized special sub–camps. In 1945 there were more than 100 such sub–camps. Dora concentration camp was initially one of them, as well as KL Ravensbrück sub–camps (from 08.1944). On 08.04.1945 Polish prisoner, Mr Guido Damazyn, used clandestinely constructed short wave transmitter to sent, together with a Russian prisoner, a short message begging for help. It was received and he got a reply: „KZ Bu. Hold out. Rushing to your aid. Staff of Third Army” (American). Three days later the camp was liberated. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.08.10]
)

Oflag IX C Rotenburg an der Fulda: German POW prisoner of war camp for officers in Rotenburg an der Fulda in Hesse. C. 60‑70 Polish Catholic priests, most of them military chaplains, captured by the Germans in 09.1939 during German invasion of Poland, were held POW there from 12.1939. In preparations for invasion of France all on 18.04.1940 were sent — in contravention of Geneva conventions of 27.07.1929 — to KL Buchenwald concentration camps. From 06.1940 Germ. Zweiglager (Eng. sub–camp) of Oflag IX A/H Spangenberg and renamed Oflag IX A/Z. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.11.17]
)

Stalag VIII B Lamsdorf: Stalag VIII B Lamsdorf (from 1943 Stalag 344 Lamsdorf) — German POW camp in Łambinowice, mainly for privates and NCOs. In 1930‑40 in excess of 40,000 Poles where kept there. Altogether c. 100,000 prisoners from Australia, Belgium, British India, British Palestine, Canada, France, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, South Africa, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man, the United States and Yugoslavia passed through this camp. In 1941 a separate camp, Stalag VIII–F was set up close by to house the Soviet prisoners. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.11.17]
)

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. In a political sense, the pact was an attempt to restore the status quo ante before 1914, with one exception, namely the „commercial” exchange of the so–called „Kingdom of Poland”, which in 1914 was part of the Russian Empire, fore Eastern Galicia (today's western Ukraine), in 1914 belonging to the Austro–Hungarian Empire. Galicia, including Lviv, was to be taken over by the Russians, the „Kingdom of Poland” — under the name of the General Governorate — Germany. The resultant „war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2015.09.30]
)

sources

personal:
kuriaczestochowa.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2013.05.19]
, www.ipgs.usClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2012.11.23]

bibliograhical:, „Schematismus Universi Venerabilis Cleri Saecularis et Regularis Dioecesis CzęstochoviensisClick to display biography”, Częstochowa diocesa Curia, 1926‑39, diocesan printing house,
original images:
www.facebook.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.03.14]
, doi.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2021.10.09]
, hinterstacheldraht.jimdo.comClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.03.14]
, www.katedrapolowa.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.01.16]

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MARTYROLOGY: KLARZAK Joseph

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